Brain and Healing

ALL TBI SURVIVORS AND CARE GIVERS NEED TO KNOW that improvement is possible, even years later. It always amazes me the amount of healing that can take place in the...

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Can I be objective and empathetic after my Brain Injury?

One thing that has confused me since my TBI is empathy. I want everyone to have it and forgive me when I'm rude, forgetful, and overwhelmed. More than anything, I...

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Magic as Therapy after Brain Injury

Being disabled is not fun! A car collision for me in 2000 resulted in a coma, fractured C1-C4 vertebrae, a Traumatic Brain Injury, and one and a half years...

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Why Bother with Families after Brain Injury?

Writing for families gets little support or recognition in clinical and academic circles. It’s time to rethink biases and disincentives that leave families uninformed and searching for information about brain...

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Finding Purpose In Being a Brain Injury Survivor

The autobiography of Brain Injury Survivor and five time cross country charity bicyclist Mike Heikes. Mike formed "helmets For Kids", giving away thousands of free helmets. It tells how Mike...

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The Grip of Anniversaries

As I write this, the calendar says July 5, 2013, but my mind is pulled back to July 5, 1998. That’s because my husband Alan suffered the massive heart attack...

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Janet Cromer Interviewed on Brain Injury Radio

This week I had the pleasure of being a guest of Kim Justus, host of the Recovery Now show, on Brain Injury Radio. Kim is a brain injury survivor and...

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Head Injury: Where the Rubber Meets the Road

My wheelbarrow tire suddenly goes flat. With the spring thaw, dirt and debris to be loaded on and carted around, not good timing. What to do? What turns out is a...

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Hi God, it’s me, David – After My Brain Injury!

Since my accident, I’ve taken up an interest in nuclear physics. That alone is a bit of an oddity. Most of your Kids don’t realize that all the matter that...

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The Near Normal after Brain Injury

Four years ago, I survived two Mild Traumatic Brain Injuries, one from a car accident in which I was broadsided while idling at a stoplight. My driver’s side and curtain...

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Brain and Healing

ALL TBI SURVIVORS AND CARE GIVERS NEED TO KNOW that improvement is possible, even years later. It always amazes me the amount of healing that can take place in the...

Read more »

The Journey of Grief after Brain Injury by Janelle Breese Biagioni

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Grief after brain injury is a journey for families, survivors and caregivers. It involves loss, bereavement, grieving and mourning and life can feel suspended during the early stages of shock and grief. Janelle Breese Biagioni explains various types of grief and mourning, including ambiguous grief and extraordinary mourning. By understanding the grief process, families can regain a sense of hope.

I Found my Brain on the Radio by Kim Jefferson Justus

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Now and advocate for brain injury survivors after her misdiagnosis when she had an aneurysm, Kim Justus is now and author and radio host featuring interviews with survivors, families, caregivers, and clinicians. She interviews survivors and provides educational information on “life after brain injury” and issues related to caregiving. She discusses the problems she and other survivors face as well as the solutions they have found.

Ambiguous Loss Wounds Veterans and Family by Marilyn Lash, MSW

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Ambiguous loss can not be seen but it is real and felt by combat veterans, their families and caregivers who struggle with the invisible wounds of war. The story of a World War 2 veteran Louis Zamperini illustrates how even the most strong willed and courageous combat veteran found another war at home with chronic PTSD that almost destroyed him. How much has changed with our returning veterans today?

Hobby Night for TBI Survivor Support by William C. Jarvis, Ed.D.

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William Jarvis shows how having a hobby night at a TBI Survivor Support Group can help build confidence, cognition and language expression. As a long-time survivor of a truamatic brain injury, Bill Jarvis has found innovative methods and practices to continue his cognitive rehabilitation and retraining over the years.

Take the Danger Out of TBI Caregiver Anger by Janet Cromer

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The anger of the TBI caregiver is too often ignored by family, friends and even professionals. While clinicians focus on helping the person with a brain injury whose ability to control anger has been affected, who helps the TBI caregiver whose anger is often not even acknowledged. Janet Cromer explores why it is important to recognize that this anger is real and gives strategies for TBI caregivers to manage that anger. By recognizing what trigger TBI caregiver anger, she helps caregivers respond with positive strategies.

When TBI Improvement is Hard to See! by William C. Jarvis, Ed.D.

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William (Bill) Jarvis) explores how TBI improvement is a life long process requiring goals, focus and accountability by survivors of brain injury. After the initial rapid gains of medical treatment and rehabilitation, many survivors find it hard to monitor the more subtle and gradual signs of TBI improvement. His experience and approach is testimony to the value of persi

TBI Loss and Your Personal Power by Jeff Sebell

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Jeff Sebell explores how and why a brain injury or TBI can result in loss of personal power for survivors. When your brain isn’t functioning as it used to after an injury, the changes in a survivor’s life can feel like you’ve lost the power to live your life the way you want to and to be the person you want to be.
TBI causes this loss of personal power by filling the survivor with confusion, indecision, forgetfulness and passivity. He explores how to reclaim your personal power by focusing on how you perceive the world and using the power of your mind.

Never Give Up Hope after Brain Injury by Jessica Smith

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Jessica Smith is a TBI survivor who managed to hold on to hope after brain injury, even when she could not speak, walk or care for herself. She describes how she fought back and fostered the flicker of hope even when the future seemed unbearable. Describing the love and support of her mom, she credits her presence throughout the ordeal with helping her fight back and regain her life. Her essay is a frank exploration of the pain of loss and the importance of hope even when things look darkest.

Obsidian by Katie Gielas – emotional trauma of a teen with TBI

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Katie Gielas sustained a traumatic brain injury TBI in adolescence. She reveals her emotional trauma as she fell into a pit of grief and despair revealed by her poignant poem Obsidian. Her writing reveals the struggles and losses she has experienced with not only the loss of her friends, but the loss of her self.

What Do You Expect of Your Family after Brain Injury? by Rosemary Rawlins

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Rosemary Rawlins recalls that everything that was “normal” about her family and the routine of their daily life was so taken for granted and then it was shaken to the core after her husband’s brain injury. How do you face the uncertainty of the future and how do you make a new life plan when it is unclear what the meaning of “recovery” will be?