Brain and Healing by William Jarvis

ALL TBI SURVIVORS AND CARE GIVERS NEED TO KNOW that improvement is possible, even years later. It always amazes me the amount of healing that can take place in the...

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Can I be Objective and Have Empathy after my Brain Injury?

One thing that has confused me since my TBI is empathy. I want everyone to have it and forgive me when I'm rude, forgetful, and overwhelmed. More than anything, I...

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Magic as Therapy after Brain Injury

Being disabled is not fun! A car collision for me in 2000 resulted in a coma, fractured C1-C4 vertebrae, a Traumatic Brain Injury, and one and a half years...

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Why Bother with Families after Brain Injury?

Writing for families gets little support or recognition in clinical and academic circles. It’s time to rethink biases and disincentives that leave families uninformed and searching for information about brain...

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Finding Purpose In Being a Brain Injury Survivor by Mike Heikes

The autobiography of Brain Injury Survivor and five time cross country charity bicyclist Mike Heikes. Mike formed "helmets For Kids", giving away thousands of free helmets. It tells how Mike...

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The Grip of Anniversaries

As I write this, the calendar says July 5, 2013, but my mind is pulled back to July 5, 1998. That’s because my husband Alan suffered the massive heart attack...

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Janet Cromer Interviewed on Brain Injury Radio

This week I had the pleasure of being a guest of Kim Justus, host of the Recovery Now show, on Brain Injury Radio. Kim is a brain injury survivor and...

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Head Injury: Where the Rubber Meets the Road by Ron Harnett

My wheelbarrow tire suddenly goes flat. With the spring thaw, dirt and debris to be loaded on and carted around, not good timing. What to do? What turns out is a...

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Hi God, it’s me, David – After My Brain Injury! by David Grant

Since my accident, I’ve taken up an interest in nuclear physics. That alone is a bit of an oddity. Most of your Kids don’t realize that all the matter that...

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The Near Normal after Brain Injury

Four years ago, I survived two Mild Traumatic Brain Injuries, one from a car accident in which I was broadsided while idling at a stoplight. My driver’s side and curtain...

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Brain and Healing by William Jarvis

ALL TBI SURVIVORS AND CARE GIVERS NEED TO KNOW that improvement is possible, even years later. It always amazes me the amount of healing that can take place in the...

Read more »

Regaining a Sense of Self by Hilary Zayed

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Losing her sense of self may have been the most painful invisible loss after her brain injury. Hilary Zayed explores the meaning of self and the process of “reinvention” of her new self through her artwork as she rebuilt her identity and explored her future and the meaning of survival. Her new book Regaining a Sense of Self describes the process.

Real-Life Superheroes Do Exist (I’ve Seen Them)! by Kim Thompson

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You don’t have to be superman or superwoman to have special talents or powers. Kim Thompson’s brain injury blog explores what we expect from our superheroes and suggests that survivors of TBI are the most powerful heroes just by facing each new day.

Holiday Stress and Brain Injury by Donna O’Donnell Figurski

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Holidays can be joyful and stressful for everyone, but holiday stress can affect brain injury survivors in many ways. Expectations of families, spending for gifts, parties and crowds, can feel overwhelming and increase anxiety. The consistency and structure that is so important for coping after brain injury can be lost in the holiday madness. Donna O’Donnell Figurski gives tips and strategies for coping with holiday stress after TBI.

When All Seems Hopeless to a Brain Injury Survivor! by William C. Jarvis, Ed.D.

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Contrary to personal feelings, it is when all seems hopeless that the Brain Injury Survivor needs to go forward in life. Bill Jarvis has struggled with hope and losing hope and knows the trials and heartache of loss and the long journey of recovery.

A Typical Day with a Brain Injury! (humor) by William C. Jarvis, Ed. D.

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Bill Jarvis shows how a “simple” trip to the store can turn into a confusing maze of detours and surprises when living with a brain injury. He has found that while brain injury isn’t funny, humor helps you cope – and that’s the title of his new book.

Most Basic Virtue after a TBI is Cognition by William Jarvis, EdD

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What is the most important thing to the TBI Survivor for improvement? Some would think perseverance and some would think consistency. Both are important, but there may be an even more influential virtue.

I suggest that the most influential virtue is “thought.” It is not what a person thinks, but that there is the ability to think in the first place.

Learn From Your Failures after Brain Injury by William C. Jarvis, Ed. D.

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Failure is not the end but the beginning of the journey for survivors of brain injury or TBI. Bill Jarvis explores how learning from failure brings you closer to success. It is the process of learning from mistakes that helps you go forward.

Healing Power of Journaling by Barbara Stahura, CJF

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Journaling is a method that both survivors of TBI and caregivers can use to cope with the aftermath of brain trauma. Life after brain injury—to yourself or a loved one—can feel as if you’ve been hijacked to an alien planet where nothing feels familiar or makes sense. How can you possibly make meaning or find healing there? Barbara Stahura explains that journaling is one way to express your emotions, explore your options, and examine your life. Simple writing from both your heart and head for just a few minutes several times a week can help you heal and build resilience.

What I Learned From a Bathtub by Ann Zuccardy

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Ann Zuccardy relates how even a mild brain injury from a simple household accident can change the nature of how one deals with day to day events.

Teens and Concussion: More Than Meets the Eye by Phil Hossler, ATC

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As sport becomes more of a fixture in the lives of Americans, the burden of responsibility falls on the shoulders of the various organizations, coaches, parents, clinicians, officials, and researchers to provide an environment that minimizes the risk of injury.