Brain and Healing

ALL TBI SURVIVORS AND CARE GIVERS NEED TO KNOW that improvement is possible, even years later. It always amazes me the amount of healing that can take place in the...

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Can I be objective and empathetic after my Brain Injury?

One thing that has confused me since my TBI is empathy. I want everyone to have it and forgive me when I'm rude, forgetful, and overwhelmed. More than anything, I...

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Magic as Therapy after Brain Injury

Being disabled is not fun! A car collision for me in 2000 resulted in a coma, fractured C1-C4 vertebrae, a Traumatic Brain Injury, and one and a half years...

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Why Bother with Families after Brain Injury?

Writing for families gets little support or recognition in clinical and academic circles. It’s time to rethink biases and disincentives that leave families uninformed and searching for information about brain...

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Finding Purpose In Being a Brain Injury Survivor

The autobiography of Brain Injury Survivor and five time cross country charity bicyclist Mike Heikes. Mike formed "helmets For Kids", giving away thousands of free helmets. It tells how Mike...

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The Grip of Anniversaries

As I write this, the calendar says July 5, 2013, but my mind is pulled back to July 5, 1998. That’s because my husband Alan suffered the massive heart attack...

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Janet Cromer Interviewed on Brain Injury Radio

This week I had the pleasure of being a guest of Kim Justus, host of the Recovery Now show, on Brain Injury Radio. Kim is a brain injury survivor and...

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Head Injury: Where the Rubber Meets the Road

My wheelbarrow tire suddenly goes flat. With the spring thaw, dirt and debris to be loaded on and carted around, not good timing. What to do? What turns out is a...

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Hi God, it’s me, David – After My Brain Injury!

Since my accident, I’ve taken up an interest in nuclear physics. That alone is a bit of an oddity. Most of your Kids don’t realize that all the matter that...

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The Near Normal after Brain Injury

Four years ago, I survived two Mild Traumatic Brain Injuries, one from a car accident in which I was broadsided while idling at a stoplight. My driver’s side and curtain...

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Brain and Healing

ALL TBI SURVIVORS AND CARE GIVERS NEED TO KNOW that improvement is possible, even years later. It always amazes me the amount of healing that can take place in the...

Read more »

New Manual on TBI Hope, A Manual for Emotional Recovery helps Families, Caregivers, and Survivors

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A new manual TBI Hope by Denise Boggs and Debbie A. Leonhardt, M.A. addresses the often neglected aspect of emotional recovery for families, caregivers and survivors. This step-by-step manual gives families essential tools to help them transition into their new life when caring for a family member who had a traumatic brain injury. The process of emotional healing is often overlooked in the medical treatment of TBI but it is essential for families and survivors to rebuild their lives and relationships in the journey of brain injury.

You Disappear by Christian Jungersen

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You Disappear by Christian Jungersen is a thriller of a book that explores the vulnerability of relationships, a person’s sense of identity and moral responsibilities when a brain tumor irreversibly alters not only a personality but the nature and course of life. This book is so much more a medical diagnosis. It will capture and intrigue your interest in a unique blend of deft plotting, brain research, and life questions.

Youth Sports and Young Brains Need Time to Develop by Phil Hossler, ATC

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Concussion in youth sports has special risks because the brains of children and adolescents are still developing. Athletic trainer Phil Hossler shares data on sports concussions in school age children and discusses why it is critical for athletes, coaches, parents, educators and school nurses to become informed. The impact of a concussion can extend far beyond the playing field to the classroom and home. Only by early diagnosis and careful management can athletes and students receive the rest, supports and accommodations that may be needed.

Talking with Your Spouse or Charlie Brown’s Teacher? Miscommunication in Couples after Brain Injury by Dawn Neumann, PhD

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Miscommunication between couples when one partner has a brain injury can lead to frustration, anger, guilt and avoidance. Good communication is the foundation for a good relationship. Without it, relationships are as vulnerable as a house of cards. Miscommunication after a brain injury tends to revolve around the couple’s inability to share and understand each other’s emotions and needs.

Executive Skills in Children and Teens with Brain Injury by Janet Tyler, Ph.D.

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Students with traumatic brain injuries often have injuries to their frontal lobes causing changes in their executive skills. This can make it harder for them to initiate activities, plan and prioritize, organize their work, problem solve, and control impulses. Getting through the day at school and completing homework at home can be a struggle. Dr. Janet Tyler explains how specific classroom strategies can help these students learn more effectively and improve their executive skills.

Silent Cries and Traveling Forward by Michael Ciafone

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Michael Ciafone has written two books on living with a traumatic brain injury. Silent Cries and Traveling Forward will take you on his journey of faith, hope, and perseverance as he finds meaning in his life once more and travels forward.

TBI Treatment – Beyond the Brain on Oct. 24, 2014

Brain Injury Association of North Carolina hosts a one day conference TBI Treatment: Beyond the Brain on October 24, 2014 in Concord, NC.

Mental Health Challenges across US

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Mental Health challenges every state in the US. Find data and spending for your state and compare with others. Just click on any state and see the figures.

My Issues Become the Paper’s Issues: Why I Write Now by Matthew Brown

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Writing got me in touch with my emotions after I came home from Iraq. Through writing about my life during my time in the Marine Corps and after, I started to get in touch with the deep down, raw emotions of the darkest corners of my mind. They truly scared me, and I really did not know what to do with them. With encouragement from my wife and some pushing from Melanie, I started to express these emotions on paper, in ways I never had before. The power of releasing those emotions was amazing. I started to feel the stress of the hard times in my life beginning to fade. They never will go away, because they are part of me, but they started to fade. I just started writing, and my writing became free form poetry.

Writing to Heal: The Veterans Writing Project by Barbara Stahura

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Ron Capps manages the Veterans’ Writing Project which helps wounded warriors manage stress and cope with PTSD and TBI by writing and journaling as self-expression. “Either you control the memory or the memory controls you.” These words on a sign in Ron Capps’ office remind him not only of how he has learned to deal with his own past but also how his new work helps others. Fortunately, he learned from his doctors at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center that “the arts bring back the higher brain function.” Writing, his chosen art, helps him get control of his traumatic memories, unlike “therapy, medication, and whiskey,” which didn’t, he says