Brain and Healing

ALL TBI SURVIVORS AND CARE GIVERS NEED TO KNOW that improvement is possible, even years later. It always amazes me the amount of healing that can take place in the...

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Can I be objective and empathetic after my Brain Injury?

One thing that has confused me since my TBI is empathy. I want everyone to have it and forgive me when I'm rude, forgetful, and overwhelmed. More than anything, I...

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Magic as Therapy after Brain Injury

Being disabled is not fun! A car collision for me in 2000 resulted in a coma, fractured C1-C4 vertebrae, a Traumatic Brain Injury, and one and a half years...

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Why Bother with Families after Brain Injury?

Writing for families gets little support or recognition in clinical and academic circles. It’s time to rethink biases and disincentives that leave families uninformed and searching for information about brain...

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Finding Purpose In Being a Brain Injury Survivor

The autobiography of Brain Injury Survivor and five time cross country charity bicyclist Mike Heikes. Mike formed "helmets For Kids", giving away thousands of free helmets. It tells how Mike...

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The Grip of Anniversaries

As I write this, the calendar says July 5, 2013, but my mind is pulled back to July 5, 1998. That’s because my husband Alan suffered the massive heart attack...

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Janet Cromer Interviewed on Brain Injury Radio

This week I had the pleasure of being a guest of Kim Justus, host of the Recovery Now show, on Brain Injury Radio. Kim is a brain injury survivor and...

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Head Injury: Where the Rubber Meets the Road

My wheelbarrow tire suddenly goes flat. With the spring thaw, dirt and debris to be loaded on and carted around, not good timing. What to do? What turns out is a...

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Hi God, it’s me, David – After My Brain Injury!

Since my accident, I’ve taken up an interest in nuclear physics. That alone is a bit of an oddity. Most of your Kids don’t realize that all the matter that...

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The Near Normal after Brain Injury

Four years ago, I survived two Mild Traumatic Brain Injuries, one from a car accident in which I was broadsided while idling at a stoplight. My driver’s side and curtain...

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Brain and Healing

ALL TBI SURVIVORS AND CARE GIVERS NEED TO KNOW that improvement is possible, even years later. It always amazes me the amount of healing that can take place in the...

Read more »

Getting Organized After Brain Injury

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Getting organized and being able to complete multiple tasks is often a real challenge for a person who has sustained a brain injury. It is extremely disheartening when they previously could juggle a dozen things at once to not being able to complete one task, let alone two.

Return to the Scene of the Crime After Brain Injury

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Like a wand searching for water, a divining rod, is it not unusual for the brain injured to return to the scene of the crime? One chapter ends while another one begins.

Back to School on a Budget

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The return to school is right around the corner! While parents may be looking forward to children returning to the routine of school, the expenses of clothes and supplies can often be challenging. Here are a few ideas to help take the strain out of your wallet:

Support System

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We often need the support and loyalty of our family and friends. This holds true, perhaps even more so, when an individual and their family endures an injury, illness, death or other life transition.

A key element in healing physically, emotionally and even spiritually is that we need to activate a support system. Our personal network of support includes friends, family, extended family, co-workers and acquaintances. They rally around us to offer their company, food, help, and good wishes when we need it.

Understanding Brain Injury as a Chronic Disease

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Many brain injury survivors live many years after the injury. Some continue to make progress and do well, while others develop more health problems. There is a new way of thinking about brain injury that has implications for all survivors and their caregivers. The Brain Injury Association of America (BIAA) is striving to have brain injury reclassified as a chronic disease.

Caregiver Goals

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It is summer and the heat wave that has covered the United States makes it harder for the elderly and people with chronic health and respiratory issues. I drove home from an appointment today in 102 degree heat. The car always registers a bit hotter, but my neighbor said her car read the same. The humidity sucks the breathe right out of you.

RICO REMINDS ME… I am loved!

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I wasn’t planning on getting another dog, that fine June day, when I found Rico. Or maybe it is better to say when Rico found me. “No dog is better than the wrong dog,” I tried to explain to Katie, a young teenager, who didn’t quite believe me. Her mother, Sheila, had tried to explain to Katie that I was very serious and that she should NOT pressure me to get another dog. Somehow, Katie did not really believe her mother or me.

Motivation!

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It is very challenging to get motivated when you are not feeling good about your situation. It’s normal for individuals to experience a drop in motivation following loss. Survivors may also experience a lack of motivation resulting from the injury to their brain. In any instance, a lack of motivation can result in the person becoming isolated and taking a direct hit to their self-esteem. It’s a vicious circle… don’t feel motivated, feel awful about myself, feel awful about myself… don’t feel motivated. Breaking the cycle isn’t easy, but it can be done. It requires determination, creativity and most of all, patience.

Social Skills Development

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The recent economic status of our country has brought the need to acquire or attain skills to the forefront of people’s minds. With the competitive job market, the more one has to offer, the greater are their chances to succeed. It has become evident that skills are needed in all aspects of life. Life skills are needed to live independently; specific work skills are needed to do a specific type of job (i.e., a carpenter is needed to build), social skills are needed to interact in society; relational skills are needed to maintain healthy and meaningful relationships and so on. Napoleon Dynamite even noted the need for skills when he stated, “You know, like nun chuck skills, bow hunting skills, computer hacking skills…girls only want boyfriends who have great skills.” The reality is that skills are needed in all aspects of life, but not all skills are needed as much as others. Social skills for example, are not only needed, but one must really work to attain so that they can continue to reach new levels in their life.

The Importance of Family and Friends

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When our son was born severely brain injured, it felt as if our world had crumbled. Every dream we had had for him was put on hold. Instead, we had new hurdles to climb and they weren’t going to be easy.