Clinician's Guide to PTSD

Clinician's Guide to PTSD

Steven Taylor
This practitioner's guide, now thoroughly updated, examines the nature of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and provides a complete framework for planning and implementing cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). Steven Taylor addresses the complexities of treating people who have experienced different types of trauma and shows how to adapt empirically supported protocols to each client's needs. Rich case examples illustrate the nuts and bolts of cognitive interventions, exposure exercises, and adjunctive methods.
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Full Description

This practitioner's guide, now thoroughly updated, examines the nature of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and provides a complete framework for planning and implementing cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). Steven Taylor addresses the complexities of treating people who have experienced different types of trauma and shows how to adapt empirically supported protocols to each client's needs. Rich case examples illustrate the nuts and bolts of cognitive interventions, exposure exercises, and adjunctive methods.
Details
Item CLGP
ISBN# 9781462530489
Pages 372
Cover softback
Year 2017

Authors

Steven Taylor, PhD, is a clinical psychologist and Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of British Columbia. He is Associate Editor of the Journal of Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders and previously served as Editor of the Journal of Cognitive Psychotherapy and Associate Editor of Behaviour Research and Therapy. Dr. Taylor's research focuses on the etiology and treatment of anxiety and related disorders, conceptualized from a biopsychosocial perspective. His work has been recognized with awards from the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, the Anxiety Disorders Association of America, and the Canadian Psychological Association, among others. He has authored over 300 scientific journal articles and book chapters and several books.

Contents

I. Conceptual and Empirical Foundations

1. Clinical Features of PTSD

2. Cognitive and Behavioral Features of PTSD: What the Research Tells Us

3. Cognitive-Behavioral Theories

4. Neurobiology for the Cognitive-Behavioral Therapist

5. Treatments: A Review of the Research

II. Treatment Methods and Protocols

6. Assessment for Treatment Planning and Evaluation

7. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy: An Overview

8. Developing a Case Formulation and Treatment Plan

9. Psychoeducation, Treatment Engagement, and Emotion Regulation Strategies

10. Cognitive Interventions I: General Considerations and Approaches

11. Cognitive Interventions II: Methods for Specific Types of Beliefs

12. Exposure Exercises I: Imaginal and Interoceptive Exposure

13. Exposure Exercises II: Situational Exposure

14. Adjunctive Methods and Relapse Prevention

15. Combining Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy with Pharmacotherapy

References

Index

Excerpts

John was driving his three young children to the park when they were struck head-on by a driver attempting to overtake a truck on a sharp bend. John’s car was wrecked and he developed posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), with the most severe symptoms being persistent nightmares of the accident, profound fear and avoidance of driving, and chronic tension, irritability, and guilt about not being able to swerve out of the path of the oncoming vehicle. His children received minor cuts and bruises, from which they quickly recovered. They had more difficulty overcoming the psychological impact of the crash. In the weeks afterward, the youngest, a 4-year-old girl, frequently complained of stomachaches and refused to be out of sight of her father for fear that something bad would happen.

The two older boys, ages 7 and 8, had recurrent nightmares. During the day, the boys often engaged in stereotypical play, in which they pretended to be driving cars. They would crash into one other and both fall to the ground. The boys would then get up and run around pretending to shoot one another, shouting, “You’re the bad man!” “No, you’re the bad man!” Sometimes this escalated to the point that they physically fought with one another. John and his children provide us with examples of the wide range of problems people often experience in the wake of traumatic experiences.

We see these patients frequently in our practices, sometimes presenting with what might look like relatively simple anxiety or depressive problems, or anger management issues. But as we engage with these patients and families, a more complex pattern emerges, and we recognize the problems they present with as both intransigent and multilayered. How do we spot symptoms of PTSD and how do we differentiate it from other clinical problems? Furthermore, once we have a fair picture of the underlying causes of the patient’s problems, just how should we treat them?

Reviews

This A comprehensive, accessible text that will likely appeal to a wide range of clinicians with varying levels of experience....This book is truly a 'Clinician's Guide'....A thorough, hands-on text.”

—Journal of Contemporary Psychotherapy (on the first edition)

“Taylor—a CBT master therapist—has revised and updated his A to Z volume that is a 'must read' for every clinician treating PTSD and every clinical student. Including recent innovations, the book is accessible and features case examples throughout. The book reviews the literature and delves into assessment, case formulation, cognitive interventions, exposure exercises, and, in a new chapter, combining CBT with pharmacotherapy. Even seasoned clinicians will discover new information that will change their practice.”

— Barbara Olasov Rothbaum, PhD, ABPP, Professor of Psychiatry and Director, Emory Healthcare Veterans Program and Trauma Anxiety Recovery Program, Emory University School of Medicine

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