Brain and Healing by William Jarvis

ALL TBI SURVIVORS AND CARE GIVERS NEED TO KNOW that improvement is possible, even years later. It always amazes me the amount of healing that can take place in the...

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Can I be Objective and Have Empathy after my Brain Injury?

One thing that has confused me since my TBI is empathy. I want everyone to have it and forgive me when I'm rude, forgetful, and overwhelmed. More than anything, I...

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Magic as Therapy after Brain Injury

Being disabled is not fun! A car collision for me in 2000 resulted in a coma, fractured C1-C4 vertebrae, a Traumatic Brain Injury, and one and a half years...

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Why Bother with Families after Brain Injury?

Writing for families gets little support or recognition in clinical and academic circles. It’s time to rethink biases and disincentives that leave families uninformed and searching for information about brain...

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Finding Purpose In Being a Brain Injury Survivor by Mike Heikes

The autobiography of Brain Injury Survivor and five time cross country charity bicyclist Mike Heikes. Mike formed "helmets For Kids", giving away thousands of free helmets. It tells how Mike...

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The Grip of Anniversaries

As I write this, the calendar says July 5, 2013, but my mind is pulled back to July 5, 1998. That’s because my husband Alan suffered the massive heart attack...

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Janet Cromer Interviewed on Brain Injury Radio

This week I had the pleasure of being a guest of Kim Justus, host of the Recovery Now show, on Brain Injury Radio. Kim is a brain injury survivor and...

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Head Injury: Where the Rubber Meets the Road by Ron Harnett

My wheelbarrow tire suddenly goes flat. With the spring thaw, dirt and debris to be loaded on and carted around, not good timing. What to do? What turns out is a...

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Hi God, it’s me, David – After My Brain Injury! by David Grant

Since my accident, I’ve taken up an interest in nuclear physics. That alone is a bit of an oddity. Most of your Kids don’t realize that all the matter that...

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The Near Normal after Brain Injury

Four years ago, I survived two Mild Traumatic Brain Injuries, one from a car accident in which I was broadsided while idling at a stoplight. My driver’s side and curtain...

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Brain and Healing by William Jarvis

ALL TBI SURVIVORS AND CARE GIVERS NEED TO KNOW that improvement is possible, even years later. It always amazes me the amount of healing that can take place in the...

Read more »

Make Every Day Holiday!!!!

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Put the holiday into perspective — It’s just a day that will be followed by another day and so on. By avoiding complaining, grumbling, or negativity about the celebration of any particular holiday, you will undoubtedly be in a better place. Though life is not as it was pre-brain injury and you most likely can’t celebrate as you once did, you can definitely honor and appreciate the very significant fact that you survived. You are alive!

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BRAIN INJURY JOURNEY BULLETIN: EXECUTIVE FUNCTIONS — Critical and Vital to Organization, Prioritizing, and Behaviors

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The brain, when it is functioning at optimum capacity, works in a unified way allowing us to take in information, process it, and act in a purposeful fashion. Purposeful behavior allows us to live safely in our environment, accomplish goals, and succeed to the best of our ability. Although the brain works in a unified way, the control mechanisms are complex systems. One system is executive functions. When they are compromised, there is a failure to organize and prioritize actions and behaviors.

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Shining the Spotlight on Caregiving Children of TBI by Janet Cromer, R.N.

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Studies have shown that caregiving can negatively impact children emotionally, physically, academically, socially, and behaviorally. Many families affected by brain injury or PTSD know how hard it is to live with the injured person’s angry outbursts and unpredictable behavior.

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NEWS RELEASE: APT-2 French Version

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NEWS RELEASE: l’ATTENTION PROCESSUS TRAINING Manual II (APT-II) en Français  translated by Sophie Blanchet Author & Developer: McKay Moore Sohlberg, Ph.D. Développé par McKay Moore Sohlberg, Ph.D. et Catherine Mateer, Ph.D., traduit par Sophie Blanchet, le programme APT-II est conçu pour les adolescents, les adultes et les personnes âgées avec de légères difficultés cognitives et des […]

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BRAIN INJURY JOURNEY BULLETIN: “Caregivers – The Visible/Invisible TBI Support Network”

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Living with a brain injury, for the survivor and the caregiver, is a process of exploration. There are no ready-made answers. Instead, caregivers and survivors – you – have to find your path together. During this exploration phase, the common goal is to help the person with the brain injury regain control of his life. All want him to manage his life and shape it to the best of his ability. In other words, the common goal is to help the person with the brain injury regain autonomy.

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Cognitive Rehabilitation After Brain Injury

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Cognitive Rehabilitation After Brain Injury by Kimberly S. Hutchinson, PhD and Lawrence S. Dilks, PhD You Know Someone Who has Experienced A Brain Injury If you are reading this, it’s likely that you or someone you know has experienced a brain injury. As recently reported, about 7,000 people a day are affected by some form of […]

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TBI Support Groups – How Important Are They?

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Because our world supports more than twenty-four (24) different time zones, there is always someone available to talk with 24/7. That is one of the major advantages of belonging to support groups on social media. I am so grateful that I stumbled onto them. I finally knew that I and David weren’t alone.

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Social Media: as an Advocate how do you use it?

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Twitter is unlike Facebook or LinkedIn because it doesn’t ask you to “friend” or “connect” with anyone.

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BRAIN INJURY JOURNEY BULLETIN: Memory

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WHAT IS MEMORY ANYWAY? Changes in memory are one of the most common symptoms and consequences of brain injury reported by survivors. They can affect everything from the remembering an appointment to the ability to hold a job. The frustration can also be felt by families and caregivers who tire of hearing, “I don’t remember,” and when well-intentioned reminders are ignored. Often memory is explained by two types of losses – short-term and long-term. For example, there is the person who can’t remember what he did yesterday (short-term), but can remember his wedding 30 years ago (long-term).

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When Caring Too Much Hurts by Carolyn Rocchio

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There’s a fine line between mothering and smothering, and it can be difficult to know when that line is being crossed. Without realizing it, we find ourselves doing more and more as if raising a child from infancy; however, statistically the injured family member is a young adult, more often a male than a female.

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