Brain and Healing by William Jarvis

traumatic brain injuryBrain Injury Blog by William C. Jarvis, Ed. D.

Monday, October 7, 2013

Brain Injury and Healing

All TBI survivors and caregivers need to know that improvement is possible, even years later. It always amazes me the amount of healing that can take place in the brain. The brain is always trying to do things in parts that have been injured and even sometimes other parts of the brain take over. This does not mean 100% healing, but it does mean you can be better tomorrow than you are today!!!

Survivors will experiences different amount of healing and in different functions.  Be patient to see healing and never stop working on it.  It is when you stop that the potential for healing stops.  The important thing to remember is not to be discouraged and always think optimistically.  This will do far more for healing and psychological wellness.

Why is every TBI different? Then, what are the answers? Because the brain controls every part of the body, (movement, speech, thinking, etc.) a multitude of different limitations can exist. The answer is to always be working to improve something while at the same time develop the things you CAN DO!! You will find you are more capable than you think and can do a lot. NEVER STOP TRYING!!

Over thirteen years I have implemented specific strategies to improve healing.  While improvement has been very slow, I am amazed in my own experience how much better I am.  There are certain limitations that continue to be a problem, but I would say there are far more that have diminished greatly.  This is good news and gives real hope to TBI/ABI Survivors.

5 responses to “Brain and Healing by William Jarvis”

  1. Thank you for claiming this promise so boldly. Your words spoke to me – exactly where I am. After having suffered a mTBI, my life has been forever changed. Your words brought reassurance that the change in my life can be shaped into who I am and how I live out each day. I’m so grateful I came upon your blog!

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  2. Cali Minich says:

    Thank you Bill for your comments. I have continual perseverance to do my best in everything I set out to do. This is why I am teaching for the first time. Even though it has been tough at times, I have a passion to succeed. As a result, I believe my brain is better now than it was before my TBI 38 years ago.

  3. Dear Leon,
    Thanks for your comment. I am always frustrated when survivors report they were told that there will be no further recovery after 6 months or a year after their injury. Your experience confirms that progress remains possible over your lifetime. It may not be as rapid, but it is still moving forward.
    Marilyn Lash

  4. Leon Edward says:

    Thanks for post. Its great to share hope to caretakers and injured. I know that all injuries with brain can affect us differently but I’m in year 30 after getting shot in the back of head , and being blessed working with health professionals and communicating with other TBI , kept improving and even now.

    Even now in my 50s, I continue to improve cognitive function at the same time people I know my age are having ‘aging ‘ effects. But we have to keep at it. Keep it up! Great

  5. Casey Bachus says:

    I found this to be true with my husband. He is past 2 years from his TBI, but as he continues to work, he continues to make progress, even if it is slower than it was at the beginning.

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