Category Description:

badge2Come blog with us about brain injury! Interesting and informative postings by survivors, families, caregivers and staff of Lash and Associates. You’ll laugh; you’ll cry; you’ll want to tell your own story and this is the place to tell it! We’re always looking for new “bloggers”. Post your comments on our blog articles and share your experience. It’s easy to join this blog.

Relationship: Where is the Love? by Matthew and Cassondra Brown

post thumbnail

Matthew and Cossandra Brown talk openly about how the effects of his TBI and PTSD changed their relationship and almost destroyed their marriage. His anger, drinking, and sexual demands drove his wife away and they separated. Even his young children were scared by his anger and outbursts.Losing contol over his life and with his marriage dissolving, he sought counseling and help for his PTSD. Cossondra reveals what it was like for her as a spouse and her concerns for her children during this tumultuous time. Now reunited, they are rebuilding their marriage and future. .

Read More

We Are More Than Our Brain Injuries by Cheryl Green

post thumbnail

Cheryl Green has met people who say some of us over-identify with our brain injuries. They complain that all some of us ever talk about is our brain injury. But it’s not for others to say. A brain injury can affect all parts of your life in the present and the future. If it’s your identity, that’s wonderful. If it’s what you want to talk about, that’s wonderful too. It’s not like we’re the only people on the planet who get really into talking about one thing.

Read More

Work: A Better Approach to Finding Jobs after Brain Injury by Dawn Westfall, CCC-SLP

post thumbnail

When finding the perfect job for a person who has sustained a traumatic brain injury, most speech therapists and vocational rehab counselors look at the person’s weaknesses so she can find a job that does not require these skills. This has been a common approach in vocational re-entry for years. Although it is important not to set up anyone with a TBI for failure, basing a job search on avoiding weaknesses is often a very limiting approach. I propose a better one: Look at people’s strengths and interests, and build the job from there.

Read More

Family Chaos or Cohesion? by Rosemary Rawlins

post thumbnail

We grow up in our families and we come to know what to expect from day to day. Family routines, schedules, rituals, and traditions reinforce our sense of security and belonging. Shared values, love, and trust bind us. So it follows that when something unexpected and devastating happens to one family member, each member of the family is profoundly affected.

Finding a new family rhythm after one member has sustained a brain injury can be challenging at best or chaotic at worst, because brain injury causes immediate and drastic changes for all family members.

Read More

Meditation Brings Psychological Healing by William C. Jarvis

post thumbnail

Traumatic Brain Injury is often very discouraging on a daily basis. A TBI Survivor needs comfort in the journey of healing. Meditation offers the opportunity for gaining inner strength and peace. It is this strength that is often needed as one travels the journey of healing. People of all faiths can find comfort and strengths in the scriptures.

It is this emphasis on the peace and assurance that all meditations and faith bring to the individual that is the premise I offer. The individual process may be different, but the act of one’s implementation of his/her cultural beliefs will maximize psychological healing.

Read More

Holiday Stress – Just Don’t Say Anything Please by Jodi Ginter

post thumbnail

Jodi Ginter lost her Dad when he had a severe traumatic brain injury years ago but he survived and is living – as a very different person. The recent holidays reminded her of how much has been lost for him and for their father/daughter relationship as painful memories resurfaced. How have you coped with the holidays?

Read More

The Calm before the Storm by Delanie L. Stephenson

post thumbnail

Delanie Stephenson survived a stroke at age 33 and then had to rebuild her life. Her memoir, The Calm Beyond the Storm, Delanie describes those first harried days in the ICU to the tedious physical therapy as she slowly began to crawl her way back to recovery. Not only did Delanie walk and talk again; she emerged from her ordeal even stronger and decided that she would never again take life for granted.

Read More

Preventing and Healing Compassion Fatigue by Janet M. Cromer, RN, LMHC, CCFE

post thumbnail

Compassion fatigue is a form of complete exhaustion that results from the prolonged stress of caring for a very sick or traumatized person. Compassion fatigue depletes our physical, emotional, and spiritual reserves, so interventions must replenish those dimensions. It even interferes with how the body and mind function. Living with this extreme stress is dangerous because it can contribute to medical illness, mood disturbances, behavior changes, and substance abuse. Compassion fatigue builds up slowly as the stress response stays in overdrive for weeks, or even months.

Read More

Modalities For TBI Improvement by William C. Jarvis, Ed.D.

post thumbnail

Traumatic Brain Injury improvement can be maximized when the TBI survivor uses strategies at home. Bill Jarvis has developed specific strategies for the Jarvis Rehabilitation Method that center around different modalities of effort. These modalities are: Speaking-Hearing; Seeing; Feeling; Thinking; Experiencing. He explains how and why these strategies have both direct and indirect benefits for continuing rehabilitation and progress over time.

Read More

Friending with Brain Injury by Cheryl Green

post thumbnail

Social isolation is a huge problem after brain injury. Set like “The Dating Game,” three characters with brain injury attempt to friend each other following the rules of a host who doesn’t get it. Filled with dark comedy, the film opens a dialogue about some very painful parts of reality. This DVD by Cheryl Green is funny, endearing, painful, and insightful – it’s about living with brain injury.

Read More