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badge2Come blog with us about brain injury! Interesting and informative postings by survivors, families, caregivers and staff of Lash and Associates. You’ll laugh; you’ll cry; you’ll want to tell your own story and this is the place to tell it! We’re always looking for new “bloggers”. Post your comments on our blog articles and share your experience. It’s easy to join this blog.

Find a Good Lap!

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When I was a little girl, I already knew what Tucker had to teach me after I got hurt: Find a good lap! Not just any lap. Find a good lap. Tucker helped me remember there were lots and lots of very good laps: sitting on my mommy’s lap reading a good book, galloping on my daddy’s lap pretending I was a wild horse, and snuggling with my sisters talking about this and that.

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Happy to be Here!

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So, do I start at the beginning? The beginning here being either the date at which everything changed, or as David Copperfield so elegantly puts “To begin my life with the beginning of my life…” When I was in rehabilitation the date of my accident was the date that I usually assigned. The caveat here is that I remember so little of the stay in the hospital and during the early stages of rehab.

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Memory Enhancement and Tips

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Last week I shared cognitive rehab strategies for language skills you can practice at home. This week we’ll focus on strategies to enhance memory.

Brain injury can cause serious problems with memory. The problems might include remembering events before the brain injury or after the brain injury. It might also include problems with making and working with new memories. What could be more frightening than not remembering your name, your life, or why you’re in the hospital surrounded by strangers?

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Children and Grief after Brain Injury

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Children cannot be fooled. They know when something is wrong or when something “bad” has happened. As parents, we want to protect them and it is natural to want to keep them from experiencing pain and suffering. However, to avoid discussing with them how you feel or to not let them see you cry isn’t protecting them. Allowing them to see you cry because your heart is broken is not weak or shameful. Letting them know that they are safe in the midst of chaos and that you will all get through this together… is a gift.

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And this Year’s Award goes to…..

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ME! Really!? I don’t know what to say… sniff… this is such a surprise! I was not even aware that I was nominated! Seriously! First I’d like to thank…

That is the way I feel these days.
As a caregiver it gets very exhausting telling people all the time that things are ‘good’, ‘ok’, ‘have been better’ then try to throw in a ‘but there are days’ or ‘except that’ and then watch the looks turn to ‘oh well, at least he/she is still with you’. I get that a lot when I try to explain just HOW we are doing.

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Spiritual Insights for the Long Haul

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I am drawn by the idea of surrender to God’s will, but the pull on my will, and my consciousness is often from all the “good” things I expect of myself, and perceptions of what I must do as the mother of Brian, my son who is a brain injury survivor. What of these activities that occupy me are God’s will and what are my own plans, my own agenda, or even the world’s agenda?

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“April is the cruelest month”

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Like Eliot suggests, April is the cruelest month. It’s when guys like me, who’ve been deigned become a teacher, have seen myriad windows of opportunity slammed shut. It’s also when guys like me who’ve had a severe head injury; we find ourselves looking for another job come year’s end.

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Depression within the First Year of TBI

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Traumatic brain injury can be a sudden, unpredictable, and devastating event for individuals and their families. Depression after such a traumatic experience is not the least bit unusual. Sometimes these feelings occur immediately after the incident and other times they may show up later – weeks or months later.

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Primary and Secondary Losses

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After a loss – death, divorce, separation, or other painful transition – the person encounters primary and secondary losses. Catastrophic injuries are also ways to encounter primary and secondary losses.

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Living the Dream

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Post-trauma, you find out that the future is not what it seems. And, while each head injury has its own unique compass, our main goal is to get back on our feet. However, recovery—even years later—can be meted out in tiny doses.

For me, just out of the hospital, I remember how I had a tough time remembering the names of my younger sisters in order. I’d call Jean, Jenny or Beth, Amy, or vice versa.

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