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badge2Come blog with us about brain injury! Interesting and informative postings by survivors, families, caregivers and staff of Lash and Associates. You’ll laugh; you’ll cry; you’ll want to tell your own story and this is the place to tell it! We’re always looking for new “bloggers”. Post your comments on our blog articles and share your experience. It’s easy to join this blog.

Why Is Survivor Recovery Not Just Another Headline? by Bonnie Nish

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Concussion and survivor recovery stories told by Bonnie Nish and 19 authors, share personal experiences of support and hope. It has taken me a while to figure out in what context I wanted to frame why it was I wanted to pull this book together. Why in the middle of my own trauma would I start to think that Concussion and Mild Brain Injury: Just Another Headline was a good idea at all? Over the last few years I have had many gifts bestowed on me. Yes, some are the kind you can hold in your hand. Others however, are more cerebral and the kind you hold in your heart. Tonight I couldn’t find my keys and for an instant I could feel my stomach turn when I remembered last week having left them in the door for hours. It wasn’t that I was worried someone would walk away with them and use them later, it was that it was so reminiscent of that time in my life when I wouldn’t even have remembered putting them in the door in the first place.

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Relocation Rebound – Dealing with Mild TBI and Stress Because of Moving, by C.C. LeBlanc

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C.C. LeBlanc, a mild TBI survivor, has gone through relocation stresses and suggests that before you move, carefully examine your needs for a meaningful quality of life. Almost everything you have developed in your life to be functional will be disrupted. You need to be prepared for stress, that your TBI will be aggravated, and your coping skills will be challenged. C.C. LeBlanc would like to share some guidelines based on her own experiences.

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Coping – An Energizer Ostrich by Donna O’Donnell Figurski

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On the morning of January 13th, I awoke with a start at precisely 7:05 – the exact time eleven years ago that David and I began the journey of our new and unexpected life. We did not know what was in store for us. We didn’t even know if there was going to be an “us.” I relived the moments of David’s TBI: his excruciating pain, the wild ambulance ride, my signing on the dotted line, the taking of a saw to my husband’s skull (I didn’t do that – the surgeon did), my talking incessantly on my cell phone arranging – and arranging and arranging – flights and accommodations, my squeezing David’s hand and promising him that he would get better – even though I wasn’t sure that he would, my “threatening” that I would never forgive him if he didn’t fight to stay with me, and my telling the story – over and over and over – of how David stumbled into our bedroom with his hand clutching his eye and his falling into a coma as the paramedics strapped an oxygen mask over his face.

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Their War Came Home A documentary by veterans for veterans

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Developed to help veterans and their families recognize and understand the invisible wounds of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injury (TBI), this 50 minute documentary produced by Korean and Vietnam veterans Norm Seider, Carl Ohlson, and John Drinkard features the voices of veterans who have returned home from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Veterans describe the impact of the invisible wounds of post traumatic stress and traumatic brain injury and the effects on them and their families. Chronicling destructive cycles of depression, self medication, alcohol, and addiction, veterans and clinicians examine the search for a “new normal” after the devastation of war.

No matter how or where you served as a veteran, no matter how long ago or recently you came home… this documentary is for you, your family and those who care about you.

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Wondering: A Reflection / A Refraction

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Have you lost your self?

Why is it that our reflection of our self in the mirror is not what others

see? I see a little less color, an imperfect smile, a drabby look,

while others see me as colorful, beautiful and full of life. I hear it all the time, “You look great”!

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I’m Not “Me” Anymore (again) by Laurie Rippon

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Yup… living with brain injury’s a daily struggle. I don’t see when I make progress–I just raise the bar and work harder. Eventually I’m overwhelmed and blame myself for not using strategies I know will help. And honestly, I still measure myself by my old yardstick.

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How I Regained my Humanity after a Brain Injury by Jeff Sebell

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A brain injury brings with it a confusing barrage of physical, emotional and cognitive changes that affects the survivor deeply and personally. The simplest expression of this is when we say, “I don’t know who I am anymore.”

This is also known as a loss of humanity. It has profound implications, manifesting itself as confusion, doubt and depression, and making our “recovery” that much more difficult. In my own situation, the hardships I encountered left me thinking, a number of times, that my life wasn’t worth living.

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You Look Good, You Sound Good by Amanda C. Nachman

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How many of us have heard these words over time since our brain injuries? I have realized that having a brain injury makes people uncomfortable. They don’t know what to say. Is it because they can’t see our injury? Is it because people who care about us just want everything to be okay? It could be all of the above. I don’t know.

I look good on the outside because it was my brain, an internal organ that was damaged.

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Reasonable, Responsible, and Realistic Resolutions after TBI by Donna O’Donnell Figurski

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How many promises and resolutions have you kept? Donna Figurski gives tips for tbi survivors, families and caregivers on changing habits for a healthier lifestyle and avoiding the pitfalls of excuses. Wellness is a critical part of rehabilitation and progress and can be built into your daily routine with some adjustments and accommodations.

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When All Seems Hopeless! Hold onto Hope by William C. Jarvis, Ed.D.

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Hope! As a brain injury survivor, Bill Jarvis knows how difficult it can be to hold on to hope when so much has been lost in one’s life and relationships. But he offers both hope and encouragement to survivors that it is possible to sustain hope and to build a positive future.

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