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badge2Come blog with us about brain injury! Interesting and informative postings by survivors, families, caregivers and staff of Lash and Associates. You’ll laugh; you’ll cry; you’ll want to tell your own story and this is the place to tell it! We’re always looking for new “bloggers”. Post your comments on our blog articles and share your experience. It’s easy to join this blog.

When All Seems Hopeless to a Brain Injury Survivor! by William C. Jarvis, Ed.D.

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Contrary to personal feelings, it is when all seems hopeless that the Brain Injury Survivor needs to go forward in life. Bill Jarvis has struggled with hope and losing hope and knows the trials and heartache of loss and the long journey of recovery.

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A Typical Day with a Brain Injury! (humor) by William C. Jarvis, Ed. D.

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Bill Jarvis shows how a “simple” trip to the store can turn into a confusing maze of detours and surprises when living with a brain injury. He has found that while brain injury isn’t funny, humor helps you cope – and that’s the title of his new book.

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Most Basic Virtue after a TBI is Cognition by William Jarvis, EdD

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What is the most important thing to the TBI Survivor for improvement? Some would think perseverance and some would think consistency. Both are important, but there may be an even more influential virtue.

I suggest that the most influential virtue is “thought.” It is not what a person thinks, but that there is the ability to think in the first place.

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Learn From Your Failures after Brain Injury by William C. Jarvis, Ed. D.

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Failure is not the end but the beginning of the journey for survivors of brain injury or TBI. Bill Jarvis explores how learning from failure brings you closer to success. It is the process of learning from mistakes that helps you go forward.

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Healing Power of Journaling by Barbara Stahura, CJF

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Journaling is a method that both survivors of TBI and caregivers can use to cope with the aftermath of brain trauma. Life after brain injury—to yourself or a loved one—can feel as if you’ve been hijacked to an alien planet where nothing feels familiar or makes sense. How can you possibly make meaning or find healing there? Barbara Stahura explains that journaling is one way to express your emotions, explore your options, and examine your life. Simple writing from both your heart and head for just a few minutes several times a week can help you heal and build resilience.

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What I Learned From a Bathtub by Ann Zuccardy

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Ann Zuccardy relates how even a mild brain injury from a simple household accident can change the nature of how one deals with day to day events.

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Teens and Concussion: More Than Meets the Eye by Phil Hossler, ATC

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As sport becomes more of a fixture in the lives of Americans, the burden of responsibility falls on the shoulders of the various organizations, coaches, parents, clinicians, officials, and researchers to provide an environment that minimizes the risk of injury.

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Heartfelt Support for Family Caregivers by Barbara Stahura, CJF

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Family caregivers face multiple emotional and physical demands. This article shares the experiences of two families who faced these challenges from the TBI suffered by their veteran spouse. Hearts of Valor is one organization providing support for family caregivers dealing with the effects of TBI and PTSD in wounded veterans.

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Sharing Pain or Over-sharing? by Carolyn Roy-Bornstein, MD, FAAP

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As a pediatrician and mother of a son who sustained a traumatic brain injury when he was a teenager, Dr. Carolyn Roy-Bornstein discusses the pros and cons of sharing her personal experiences with TBI patients. Many clinicians are trained not to disclose any personal stories, but she proposes that it may be beneficial at times.

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Life of a Person with a Brain Injury by William C. Jarvis, Ed.D.

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William Jarvis has lived as a person with a brain injury for many years. While he admits that he is different and that his injury is permanent, and that there are no easy answers, he still hopes on to hope and compassion. He explores the contradictions of of so many survivors who appear “normal” while still balancing the cognitive and physical challenges that can persist over years and even a lifetime.

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