Category Description:

badge2The Brain Injury Blog is a forum for guest bloggers, authors and staff of Lash and Associates to post information. This category features articles by our most popular bloggers.

A Good Future Despite Loss!! by Cathy Powers

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Yes, I still am learning how to cope with Bryce’s death, yet, I also am finding that God is there with me. Now, I don’t need to put Him into a box I built, that doesn’t fit anyway. Today, I’m getting free from my own limiting box.

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Make Every Day Holiday!!!! by Donna O’Donnell Figurski

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Put the holiday into perspective — It’s just a day that will be followed by another day and so on. By avoiding complaining, grumbling, or negativity about the celebration of any particular holiday, you will undoubtedly be in a better place. Though life is not as it was pre-brain injury and you most likely can’t celebrate as you once did, you can definitely honor and appreciate the very significant fact that you survived. You are alive!

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Shining the Spotlight on Caregiving Children of TBI by Janet Cromer, R.N.

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Studies have shown that caregiving can negatively impact children emotionally, physically, academically, socially, and behaviorally. Many families affected by brain injury or PTSD know how hard it is to live with the injured person’s angry outbursts and unpredictable behavior.

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TBI Support Groups – How Important Are They?

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Because our world supports more than twenty-four (24) different time zones, there is always someone available to talk with 24/7. That is one of the major advantages of belonging to support groups on social media. I am so grateful that I stumbled onto them. I finally knew that I and David weren’t alone.

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Changes After Brain Injury-Part 2-Caregivers by Donna O’Donnell Figurski

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Changes After Brain Injury: Behaviors and Emotions (Part 2) — The Caregivers Role By Donna O’Donnell Figurski Anyone who has been a caregiver for a survivor of a brain injury understands that many such caregivers need and want support. An article written by Janet Cromer in “Psychology Today” clearly demonstrated that point, especially for caregivers […]

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Changes After Brain Injury-Part 1 by Donna O’Donnell Figurski

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Inside the Brain: Changes in Behaviors and Emotions After Brain Injury by Donna O’Donnell Figurski Every brain injury is different. When injury occurs to any part of the brain, there is going to be a change. The part of the brain damaged determines the kind of symptoms experienced. Because the brain is a complex organ, some damage […]

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The REAL Story about Mild Brain Injury and Concussion By Marilyn Lash, MSW

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The brain is a complex and vulnerable organ. As you can see, there is nothing mild about an injury to the brain. But by becoming more knowledgeable about mild brain injury, you can become an informed consumer of health services, effective health care provider, supportive family member, caring friend or colleague. It can happen to anyone.

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Use Your Words to Heal Within – Journaling is Free and Powerful by Janelle Breese Biagioni

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Don’t fret – journaling does not have to be an onerous task. Keeping a journal is much like keeping a little diary filled with tidbits of information that happens day to day. But you can take journaling to another level by infusing your entries with thoughts, feelings, and emotions. This is where the power of writing can help a person heal their broken heart or to record the history of their life, or to visualize their greatest dreams and desires.

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A Living Grief by Katherine A. Kimes, Ed.D.

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Katherine A. Kimes experienced the trauma of a brain injury at the age of sixteen. Her mother became the primary caretaker. This is their story in brief. Katherine gives insight into her perception and viewpoint and shows there is a need for the survivor and other family members to understand the ongoing legacy of a TBI.

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A Glimpse into My TBI: A Survivor and Educator’s Perspective by Katherine Kimes, EdD

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The most psychologically draining impairment was my inability to speak, eat, or drink. My tongue lay paralyzed in my mouth. The innate ability to communicate thoughts, emotions and simple daily life experiences was taken from me in only a matter of seconds.

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