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badge2Symptoms of brain injury can range from loss of consciousness and coma to changes in physical, cognitive, emotional, social and behavioral abilities and skills. The range and severity of symptoms are different for each person as each brain injury is unique.

These blog articles discuss the variety of symptoms from the persepctive of clinicians, survivors and families. They give readers a broader understanding of the complexity of brain injury symptoms and their consequences for a meaningful life.

BRAIN INJURY JOURNEY BULLETIN: EXECUTIVE FUNCTIONS — Critical and Vital to Organization, Prioritizing, and Behaviors

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The brain, when it is functioning at optimum capacity, works in a unified way allowing us to take in information, process it, and act in a purposeful fashion. Purposeful behavior allows us to live safely in our environment, accomplish goals, and succeed to the best of our ability. Although the brain works in a unified way, the control mechanisms are complex systems. One system is executive functions. When they are compromised, there is a failure to organize and prioritize actions and behaviors.

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NEWS RELEASE: APT-2 French Version

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NEWS RELEASE: l’ATTENTION PROCESSUS TRAINING Manual II (APT-II) en Français  translated by Sophie Blanchet Author & Developer: McKay Moore Sohlberg, Ph.D. Développé par McKay Moore Sohlberg, Ph.D. et Catherine Mateer, Ph.D., traduit par Sophie Blanchet, le programme APT-II est conçu pour les adolescents, les adultes et les personnes âgées avec de légères difficultés cognitives et des […]

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Cognitive Rehabilitation After Brain Injury

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Cognitive Rehabilitation After Brain Injury by Kimberly S. Hutchinson, PhD and Lawrence S. Dilks, PhD You Know Someone Who has Experienced A Brain Injury If you are reading this, it’s likely that you or someone you know has experienced a brain injury. As recently reported, about 7,000 people a day are affected by some form of […]

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Acceptance of TBI by Pamela Taylor

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Yesterday, I heard the words that nobody wants to hear.

“Pam, you have known that you have a traumatic brain injury. We have tried therapies and medication. Your progress has been good. But, we are at a place where your recovery will not go much farther. You have to understand that the brains cells have died and they do not come back. You are closer to the old you than you were, but getting all the way back is not possible.”

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Brain Injury Adjustments: Self-Reinvention by Rodney Smith

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Brain Injury Adjustments: Self-Reinvention by Rodney Smith The “A-HA” Moment At some point adjustment occurs during the brain injury recovery journey, and there usually is an “a-ha” moment, if you will, where we realize that big and small changes have taken place.  It is time to make the best of things as they are.  Some […]

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Changes After Brain Injury-Part 1 by Donna O’Donnell Figurski

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Inside the Brain: Changes in Behaviors and Emotions After Brain Injury by Donna O’Donnell Figurski Every brain injury is different. When injury occurs to any part of the brain, there is going to be a change. The part of the brain damaged determines the kind of symptoms experienced. Because the brain is a complex organ, some damage […]

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Why Write a Book About TBI? by Jennifer Callaghan

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I began by writing a few words, then a few sentences, and then, whole paragraphs. The more I wrote, the better I felt. I wanted, no — I needed to explain what it felt like inside the lonely head of a person with a brain injury and how the world looked.

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The REAL Story about Mild Brain Injury and Concussion By Marilyn Lash, MSW

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The brain is a complex and vulnerable organ. As you can see, there is nothing mild about an injury to the brain. But by becoming more knowledgeable about mild brain injury, you can become an informed consumer of health services, effective health care provider, supportive family member, caring friend or colleague. It can happen to anyone.

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COMA: When a Person Has Brain Injury by Ron Savage, Ed.D and Marilyn Lash-Cluett, M.S.W.

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Waiting and watching are the two words most often used by family members to describe what this time was like for them. The stress, worry and anxiety may feel overwhelming at times. It may be hard to concentrate or do even the simplest things. This period of coma is among the most difficult for family members because of its seriousness and uncertainty.

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A Living Grief by Katherine A. Kimes, Ed.D.

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Katherine A. Kimes experienced the trauma of a brain injury at the age of sixteen. Her mother became the primary caretaker. This is their story in brief. Katherine gives insight into her perception and viewpoint and shows there is a need for the survivor and other family members to understand the ongoing legacy of a TBI.

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