Category Description:

badge2Symptoms of brain injury can range from loss of consciousness and coma to changes in physical, cognitive, emotional, social and behavioral abilities and skills. The range and severity of symptoms are different for each person as each brain injury is unique.

These blog articles discuss the variety of symptoms from the persepctive of clinicians, survivors and families. They give readers a broader understanding of the complexity of brain injury symptoms and their consequences for a meaningful life.

Simon’s TBI Story, a Guest Blog (March, 2020)

This blog post is a short firsthand account (from Simon L.) that was shared in response to another blog post on the Lash & Associates Publishing website. It was well-crafted, and very enlightening…and well worth sharing!

Read More

Brain Injury Awareness Month – Find Your Tribe!

post thumbnail

To celebrate brain injury awareness month in the USA, this blog post encourages TBI survivors to “find their tribe” and encourage each other, as well as encouraging others in their TBI journey.

Read More

Seasonal Affective Disorder Can Make For Long Winter Nights After TBI

post thumbnail

Winter blues can hit hard…as actual depression when days are shortest in winter. Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) can be the culprit, and you may not even be aware of it! This blog post touches on the symptoms, and also on overall sleep issues…which run high in the TBI community.

Read More

Perfectly Imperfect for The Holidays

post thumbnail

Making the most of the Holidays can be a tall order for TBI Survivors, but this post is meant to encourage! With a few tips that may be helpful for survivors, family and friends – we hope you can find some great takeaway from it. Happy Holidays!

Read More

TBI Is A Thief…and Post-TBI Grief Is Rarely Brief

post thumbnail

Grief after TBI is a universal condition – and finding your way through is sometimes “one step forward, two steps back.” This post shares some ideas for dealing with grief, for survivors and family members, friends, etc.

Read More

Five Good Choices to Make After a TBI

post thumbnail

After a traumatic brain injury (TBI) there are plenty of things to learn, relearn, and experience before progress can be measured. This article covers 5 positive steps toward making progress as a TBI survivor. There are also some links to product that directly relate to the article – of different prices, and dealing with similar issues.

Read More

Me, Myself, and My (More or Less) Creative I

post thumbnail

By Bill Herrin   Working with the topic of brain injury at Lash & Associates Publishing, I’ve heard on quite a few occasions that TBI can seriously alter a person’s ability to do certain things that they were once highly skilled at. Some basic things can also be affected, like driving a car, riding a […]

Read More

One is The Loneliest Number

post thumbnail

Finding supportive, positive and encouraging people to surround you after TBI can be difficult – sometimes it’s out of our control. Working to be your own best supporter could be your own best option. Feeling alone in your situation can fuel you to strive even harder…make the decision to work on improvement every day!

Read More

Shuffled Neurons & Other Speed Bumps…The Search For Self-Awareness

post thumbnail

The different levels of self-awareness that arise from having a TBI can spark debate because everyone’s TBI is personal to them, but their self-awareness will never be exactly like someone else’s…although there will be common similarities. That’s where we should focus – on the broad similarities that we can all relate to, and support each other in.

Read More

Thoughts on My Cracked Head

post thumbnail

Five years later I still have occasional trouble with my memory and with writing. Music is still not enjoyable. Reading tires my brain, but I keep pushing to regain that. I occasionally see some things improve – even at five years. I have “tired brain days” especially after a hard week at work. I keep a calendar of commitments and appointments. I am organized and know where to find information that I need to know. I still am very much “in the moment.”

Read More