Category Description:

Losing your sense of who you are – or your sense of self – after a brain injury can feel devastating. So many TBI survivors ask the question, “Who am I now?” These blogs explore the meaning of sense of self and the impact of losing your identity when physical, cognitive, emotional, and behavioral challenges affect not only daily life but personal relationships.

Survivors Speak about Recovery and Acceptance

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When a life-changer like TBI occurs, moving forward and acceptance are key parts of rebuilding. This blog post discusses the myth of recovery, rising again, recalculating, family dynamics and more…a great resource with plentiful links to other articles and useful products to help along the way…for survivors, caregivers, and more.

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News Release: A TBI Survivor Journey of 16-Years

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Lash &  Associates Publishing (www.lapublishing.com) proudly presents a new publication for survivors, caregivers, and professionals working with survivors: MY BRAIN AND I By Jennifer Callaghan Jennifer shares the triumphs and gains she’s experienced over a 16-year period after sustaining severe traumatic brain injury.  In poignant detail, she writes of her struggles, the many obstacles, and […]

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News Release: New Workbook focuses on developing Right Hemisphere for those with Brain Injury

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It is never easy stepping outside a personal comfort zone. Yet, it’s an ongoing process for many who are survivors of a brain injury. Daily, the person needs to look at current capabilities, skills, and capacities and find a way to deal with the limitations and changes that have resulted from the trauma. Reconciling these changes is uncomfortable, at times agonizing, and demanding a significant level of concentration, dedication, and motivation.

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TBI Recovery Workbook Using Mandalas and Journaling

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The primary focus is to promote the balancing of both hemispheres of the brain through writing (Journaling) and coloring (Meditating). I deeply desire each survivor discover a means of self-expression through a non-threatening venue while creating and nurturing an experience that promotes quiet, healing reflection.

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Acceptance of TBI by Pamela Taylor

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Yesterday, I heard the words that nobody wants to hear.

“Pam, you have known that you have a traumatic brain injury. We have tried therapies and medication. Your progress has been good. But, we are at a place where your recovery will not go much farther. You have to understand that the brains cells have died and they do not come back. You are closer to the old you than you were, but getting all the way back is not possible.”

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Brain Injury Adjustments: Self-Reinvention by Rodney Smith

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Brain Injury Adjustments: Self-Reinvention by Rodney Smith The “A-HA” Moment At some point adjustment occurs during the brain injury recovery journey, and there usually is an “a-ha” moment, if you will, where we realize that big and small changes have taken place.  It is time to make the best of things as they are.  Some […]

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Why Write a Book About TBI? by Jennifer Callaghan

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I began by writing a few words, then a few sentences, and then, whole paragraphs. The more I wrote, the better I felt. I wanted, no — I needed to explain what it felt like inside the lonely head of a person with a brain injury and how the world looked.

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A Living Grief by Katherine A. Kimes, Ed.D.

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Katherine A. Kimes experienced the trauma of a brain injury at the age of sixteen. Her mother became the primary caretaker. This is their story in brief. Katherine gives insight into her perception and viewpoint and shows there is a need for the survivor and other family members to understand the ongoing legacy of a TBI.

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Why Is Survivor Recovery Not Just Another Headline? by Bonnie Nish

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Concussion and survivor recovery stories told by Bonnie Nish and 19 authors, share personal experiences of support and hope. It has taken me a while to figure out in what context I wanted to frame why it was I wanted to pull this book together. Why in the middle of my own trauma would I start to think that Concussion and Mild Brain Injury: Just Another Headline was a good idea at all? Over the last few years I have had many gifts bestowed on me. Yes, some are the kind you can hold in your hand. Others however, are more cerebral and the kind you hold in your heart. Tonight I couldn’t find my keys and for an instant I could feel my stomach turn when I remembered last week having left them in the door for hours. It wasn’t that I was worried someone would walk away with them and use them later, it was that it was so reminiscent of that time in my life when I wouldn’t even have remembered putting them in the door in the first place.

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Relocation Rebound – Dealing with Mild TBI and Stress Because of Moving, by C.C. LeBlanc

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C.C. LeBlanc, a mild TBI survivor, has gone through relocation stresses and suggests that before you move, carefully examine your needs for a meaningful quality of life. Almost everything you have developed in your life to be functional will be disrupted. You need to be prepared for stress, that your TBI will be aggravated, and your coping skills will be challenged. C.C. LeBlanc would like to share some guidelines based on her own experiences.

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