Category Description:

Losing your sense of who you are – or your sense of self – after a brain injury can feel devastating. So many TBI survivors ask the question, “Who am I now?” These blogs explore the meaning of sense of self and the impact of losing your identity when physical, cognitive, emotional, and behavioral challenges affect not only daily life but personal relationships.

Five Good Choices to Make After a TBI

post thumbnail

After a traumatic brain injury (TBI) there are plenty of things to learn, relearn, and experience before progress can be measured. This article covers 5 positive steps toward making progress as a TBI survivor. There are also some links to product that directly relate to the article – of different prices, and dealing with similar issues.

Read More

Me, Myself, and My (More or Less) Creative I

post thumbnail

By Bill Herrin   Working with the topic of brain injury at Lash & Associates Publishing, I’ve heard on quite a few occasions that TBI can seriously alter a person’s ability to do certain things that they were once highly skilled at. Some basic things can also be affected, like driving a car, riding a […]

Read More

Shuffled Neurons & Other Speed Bumps…The Search For Self-Awareness

post thumbnail

The different levels of self-awareness that arise from having a TBI can spark debate because everyone’s TBI is personal to them, but their self-awareness will never be exactly like someone else’s…although there will be common similarities. That’s where we should focus – on the broad similarities that we can all relate to, and support each other in.

Read More

Thoughts on My Cracked Head

post thumbnail

Five years later I still have occasional trouble with my memory and with writing. Music is still not enjoyable. Reading tires my brain, but I keep pushing to regain that. I occasionally see some things improve – even at five years. I have “tired brain days” especially after a hard week at work. I keep a calendar of commitments and appointments. I am organized and know where to find information that I need to know. I still am very much “in the moment.”

Read More

Having a Brain Injury Was Never the Plan!

post thumbnail

Having a Brain Injury Was Never the Plan!   By Barbara Webster and The Amazing Framingham Brain Injury Survivor Support Group of The Brain Injury Assoc. of Massachusetts     I never thought . . . It would be so hard to find the right medical care. Life could change so easily and so drastically […]

Read More

Who Am I Now? Loss of Self after TBI

post thumbnail

Loss of self is common after a traumatic brain injury, and can often leave survivors with the feelings of frustration, anger, confusion and more. Finding your “new normal” after loss of self, even when it means adapting to a different version of your old self is a viable option. This article addresses the challenges and encourages people facing this tough subject.

Read More

Survivors Speak about Recovery and Acceptance

post thumbnail

When a life-changer like TBI occurs, moving forward and acceptance are key parts of rebuilding. This blog post discusses the myth of recovery, rising again, recalculating, family dynamics and more…a great resource with plentiful links to other articles and useful products to help along the way…for survivors, caregivers, and more.

Read More

News Release: A TBI Survivor Journey of 16-Years

post thumbnail

Lash &  Associates Publishing (www.lapublishing.com) proudly presents a new publication for survivors, caregivers, and professionals working with survivors: MY BRAIN AND I By Jennifer Callaghan Jennifer shares the triumphs and gains she’s experienced over a 16-year period after sustaining severe traumatic brain injury.  In poignant detail, she writes of her struggles, the many obstacles, and […]

Read More

News Release: New Workbook focuses on developing Right Hemisphere for those with Brain Injury

post thumbnail

It is never easy stepping outside a personal comfort zone. Yet, it’s an ongoing process for many who are survivors of a brain injury. Daily, the person needs to look at current capabilities, skills, and capacities and find a way to deal with the limitations and changes that have resulted from the trauma. Reconciling these changes is uncomfortable, at times agonizing, and demanding a significant level of concentration, dedication, and motivation.

Read More

TBI Recovery Workbook Using Mandalas and Journaling

post thumbnail

The primary focus is to promote the balancing of both hemispheres of the brain through writing (Journaling) and coloring (Meditating). I deeply desire each survivor discover a means of self-expression through a non-threatening venue while creating and nurturing an experience that promotes quiet, healing reflection.

Read More