Category Description:

badge2Symptoms of brain injury can range from loss of consciousness and coma to changes in physical, cognitive, emotional, social and behavioral abilities and skills. The range and severity of symptoms are different for each person as each brain injury is unique.

These blog articles discuss the variety of symptoms from the persepctive of clinicians, survivors and families. They give readers a broader understanding of the complexity of brain injury symptoms and their consequences for a meaningful life.

Adolescence, Brain Injury, and Sexuality

post thumbnail

The transition from childhood to adolescence is fraught with many physical and emotional changes. It can be a difficult time for the child and parents alike. Most families experience a period of major adjustment to the child’s changing mannerisms, quest for privacy and greater independence. When a child experiences a brain injury, either at a younger age or during this period of transition, it commonly creates many more problems than a child arriving at this age without a brain injury.

Read More

Sexuality after Brain Injury

post thumbnail

One of the common consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI) is sexual dysfunction. Unfortunately addressing sexual issues as a component of rehabilitation is often overlooked for a variety of reasons.

“Sexuality is an integral part of the human experience” (Sander). We are all sexual beings and sexuality is part of our life experience. Social mores and cultural differences make sexuality a taboo issue in some societies. Many therapists and other direct care providers in hospital and rehabilitation settings are untrained about sexuality and persons with disabilities. Their personal values often interfere with their ability or comfort level discussing the topic. When sexuality is overlooked as part of rehabilitation, sexual dysfunction can become an issue that is very difficult for families to understand. Social isolation, common for persons after TBI, limits opportunities for developing meaningful relationships.

Read More

Emotional Mis-communication Changes Relationships after Brain Injury

post thumbnail

Why do many persons with brain injury have trouble developing and maintaining relationships? It may be due to changes in their ability to read and express emotions. This is essential for communicating and connecting with other people and for sustaining close relationships. Research into the expression and interpretation of emotions by survivors is examining new areas for brain injury treatment and recovery.

Read More

Cognitive Rehabilitation for Children and Youth with Brain Injury

post thumbnail

Cognitive rehabilitation for children and youth with brain injuries (tbi) must address the developmental impact of brain trauma as the child matures. Children with traumatic brain injuries have unique needs for treatment and cognitive rehabilitation that are different from adults with brain injuries.

Children and youth with acquired brain injuries are less likely to receive inpatient rehabilitation than adults. School becomes the setting for cognitive rehabilitation for students with brain injuries. Consequently, families and educators become the long term providers of educational services and rehabilitation supports in local schools and the community.

The student with a brain injury will have changing educational needs as the latent effects of trauma to the brain emerge over time. So it is important for families and educators to work together as partners to identify and meet the needs of children and youth with brain injuries.

Read More

Changes in Memory after Brain Injury: FAQs

Changes in memory after traumatic and acquired brain injury can cause difficulty for survivors, families and caregivers. CT scans can help identify changes in the brain that affect memory. The differences between long-term memory, short-term memory and post traumatic amnesia are explained. There are suggestions for improving memory at home with daily routines and exercises.

Read More

Managing Challenging Behavior after Brain Injury

post thumbnail

Identification and treatment of behavior challenges after acquired brain injury (ABI) have included behavioral modification programs, medications to control abnormal behaviors, token economies, and social reinforcement. Despite the widespread recognition of behavioral issues, today few resources exist for crisis hospitalization and treatment by mental health programs.

Read More

Children with Brain Injury: Recovery and School

post thumbnail

Recovery from brain injury is a long process for families and schools. An injury to a child’s brain is a physical and emotional trauma. Changing symptoms – a neurocognitive stall – may appear over a year after the brain injury. Students have new cognitive challenges in school as the brain recovers and learning becomes more complex in school. Family training and education of teachers on TBI are essential to help children cope and learn at home and in school.

Read More

Traumatic Brain Injury and Pituitary Hormones

post thumbnail

Pituitary hormone deficiency may result from traumatic brain injury, head trauma or subarachnoid hemorrhage (stroke). Symptoms of hormone deficiency can mimic other effects of traumatic brain injury and delay diagnosis. Physical and psychological effects of hormone deficiency are described.

Read More

Drug Use after Brain Injury

post thumbnail

Alcohol and drug use after traumatic brain injury increases risks of another brain injury. Use of drugs and alcohol after TBI can worsen recovery, impair cognition, balance and problem solving. The body’s tolerance level can change after brain injury. Drinking one alcoholic beverage may be equivalent to six drinks.

Read More

Colors for My Brain after My Brain Injury

post thumbnail

After the aneurysms ruptured in her brain, Mary Margaret Yeaton went home to new terrors as she forgot how to do the basic activities of getting through the day. After her brain injury simple tasks like showering, making a cup of coffee and taking medications seemed impossibly difficult. With a friend’s help she found using a color coding system gave her the cues and compensatory strategies she needed to help her memory and organization.

Read More