Category Description:

badge2Symptoms of brain injury can range from loss of consciousness and coma to changes in physical, cognitive, emotional, social and behavioral abilities and skills. The range and severity of symptoms are different for each person as each brain injury is unique.

These blog articles discuss the variety of symptoms from the persepctive of clinicians, survivors and families. They give readers a broader understanding of the complexity of brain injury symptoms and their consequences for a meaningful life.

TBI Student Survivor and School Success

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That last day of school in June felt liberating. I had the whole summer to recover and possibly a chance to go back to school full time in the fall. However, what I did not realize was that the stress was just beginning. Except for being tutored in two subjects a few days a week at school, I had not done any work at all from October-June. I had basically missed my entire sophomore year (I finished English, though) and I had to make it up somehow in one summer.

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TBI Affects Student Executive Skills by Teresa Sacchi Armstrong, M.A.

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Students with brain injury or TBI often struggle with executive skills in the classroom. Because these high-level cognitive functions cue other mental functions, they are critical for children’s thinking and learning in school. But challenges in executive skills do not automatically qualify a student for special education. Careful assessment of strengths and deficits along with careful lesson planning, follow-up and support by teachers are critical for students with acquired brain injuries to function and succeed in the classroom as well as with homework at home.

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Computer Usage and Traumatic Brain Injury?

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Research has determined that the use of a computer helps brain stimulation. The playing of computer games significantly improved a young boy’s concentration that was diagnosed with attention deficit disorder. A software program has been successfully used in a touch screen format to exercise the mind of an 81-year-old resident of Belmont Village Senior Living in Sabre Springs, a suburb of San Diego.

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Returning to School after Brain Injury

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I was finally able to return to school part time in January, but with much apprehension. I had just started to put the days of the week and the months of the year in order and I was working on being able to walk better in a straight line and stand still without having to grab onto something.

I was still extremely symptomatic, and did not feel well at all, and consequently, I was unable to be my old self. One really cannot understand the frustration of this until they experience it first hand. I am usually a very energetic and upbeat person, but now my personality was completely flat and emotionless. I simply could not be “present” in any situation. I had damaged my brain and had been isolated from the world for three months. I was nothing but nerves and I was feeling self-conscious. Social situations of any kind were stressful. I could feel myself wanting to socialize and be with my friends, and take part in things, but physically, I was in such pain and completely exhausted, that I just could not do it. I could hardly follow a conversation and many people talking at once were a real bother to my head.

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Unexpected Lessons from the Classroom

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Every year when I flip the calendar page to September, an urge to go back to school overtakes me. Crisp notebooks and twelve-packs of pens call to me from the shelves of Staples. I’m proud of being a lifelong learner, as so many of us are now. In addition to going back to college a few times, I’ve loved taking adult education classes in my community since 1970!

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No Two Paths are Alike by David Grant

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My Fate has lead me down a path where I do have a very unique insight into the realm of brain injury that only comes from living it. If you add together every bit of knowledge I’ve gleaned from the books I read, the websites I’ve poured through, the doctors I’ve talked to, the summation of all of that “outside information” is only a speck of dust compared to what I’ve learned firsthand by actually living daily with a brain injury.

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In-School Strategies Can Help with Students with Memory after TBI

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Many students with traumatic brain injury or TBI have cognitive deficits, but memory can be especially challenging. Dr. Katherine Kimes explains the importance of matching the student’s learning style with cognitive strategies to help and support the student in the classroom. She provides a detailed list of educational strategies that teachers can use to help the child or adolescent who has challenges with memory and comprehension due to a brain injury.

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Helping Students in School with Attention after Traumatic Brain Injury or TBI

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Students with traumatic and other acquired brain injuries often have such difficulty with attention that it affects their ability to pay attention in class, study effectively, do homework and succeed in school. Katherine Kimes provides educational tips and strategies that teachers can use in the classroom to help improve a student’s attention and performance. These practical suggestions for students with brain injury (TBI) can be used by all educational staff as well as parents.

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Managing Behavior in Children after Brain Injury or TBI

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Managing the behavior of students with traumatic brain injury can be challenging and frustrating for teachers, therapists and parents. Katherine Kimes explains four types of behavior management strategies that can be used in rehabilitation as well as at home and in school. By understanding how to identify changes in behaviors that are related to the brain injury or TBI and then measuring those behaviors, educators and therapists can develop and implement a plan to encourage positive adaptive behaviors and to decrease “problem” behaviors in children and adolescents.

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Getting Help for PTSD is a Step Forward for Veterans

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“Admitting that you have an issue with PTSD isn’t a sign of weakness. It is a sign that you are truly a strong person. Actively seeking a treatment plan or someone to talk with can be one of the most difficult things to do in your life, but it also can be one of the most rewarding.” These are the words of Matt Brown who knows first hand how hard it can be to ask for help.

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