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badge2Symptoms of brain injury can range from loss of consciousness and coma to changes in physical, cognitive, emotional, social and behavioral abilities and skills. The range and severity of symptoms are different for each person as each brain injury is unique.

These blog articles discuss the variety of symptoms from the persepctive of clinicians, survivors and families. They give readers a broader understanding of the complexity of brain injury symptoms and their consequences for a meaningful life.

Improving Your Memory after a Brain Injury

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Many survivors have changes in cognition after a traumatic brain injury. These cognitive changes often mean that thinking is simply harder and takes longer. These are the changes that so often greatly concern survivors and families. They can affect everything from making a shopping list to returning to work. Some cognitive changes are so minor or subtle that only the survivor or close family members are aware of them. Other changes are obvious and significantly affect the survivor’s daily life, relationships, ability to work or go to school. Cognitive challenges are a major factor in determining whether a survivor can live independently, must rely on family for support, or needs a residential program for assistance and supervision.

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Managing Your Stress and Anxiety after a Brain Injury

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A brain injury can cause intense stress and anxiety for survivors, family members and caregivers. It can feel overwhelming and make it difficult for you to simply get through the day. It can make it harder to think clearly, solve problems and plan ahead. By learning how to recognize the signs and symptoms of your stress and anxiety, you can learn how to use techniques to lessen and manage stress and anxiety. This is the first step in regaining control as you rebuild your lives and begin the journey of living with brain injury.

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Tips on Memory Strategies for Daily Use at Home

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Barbara Webster, author of the tip card Memory Strategies after Brain Injury shares strategies and tips that can be used daily at home. Daily life can be complicated for anyone, but it can be even more complex and stressful if you have a memory impairment after a brain injury. By designing and using strategies that fit into your personal routine, you can develop a system that works for you and your lifestyle. It has to be practical, easy to use, and address your needs for it to work for you! That’s the bottom line…does it help you remember?

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Depression after a TBI

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It was Norman Vincent Peale who said, “Change your thoughts and you can change your world”. There is a positive thought for every negative thought. It can be true for anyone with a traumatic brain injury. If a person can change his thoughts about his illness and realize that what he thinks is not necessarily an absolute, he will maintain a healthy attitude. This will have a positive effect on possible healing.

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Where Did My Memory Go after My Brain Injury?

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Changes in her memory and speech after a traumatic brain injury were difficult losses for Bridgid Ruden. Formerly a busy nurse practitioner, she now found it hard to do even the simplest tasks and errands. Even caring for her children and managing the household were constant challenges and frustrations as she frequently lost items as well as words. So many losses changed her sense of self and were further compounded by seizures. Yet she has found a new purpose in life and is now a powerful advocate and speaker for the many voices of survivors.

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Restoring Confidence after Brain Injury

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The other day I was writing about confidence after we suffer a loss. It sparked me to look at all the ways in which one’s confidence can be shattered. Events such as the death of a loved one, infidelity, divorce, relationship changes, a job loss, financial disaster and compromised health all came to mind. I was also reminded of the many individuals where a lack of confidence became a problem after they suffered a brain injury.

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Brain Injury, Alcohol and the Holidays

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Alcohol flows freely during holidays with parties and celebrations, but for brain injury survivors, families, and caregivers, it can have unexpected effects. Janelle Breese Biagioni explores how moderation or avoidance of alcohol can help reduce the stress of holidays with practical tips for caregivers and persons with brain injury.

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Maintaining Structure and Routine during the Holidays after a Traumatic Brain Injury

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The Holiday Season, although typically merry and festive, brings added pressures to our daily routine. With shopping, increased food preparation, house guests, frequent visitors, financial stress, and more demands on time, the inevitable occurs; A change in routine.

Change, although it tends to be a good thing as it helps one become, too much change and in a short time span can produce negative results for Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Survivors. Too much change could potentially result in: back tracking on earlier progress that was made and/or getting out of a set regiment thus having to re-learn areas that were previously mastered. Having a daily routine helps one stay on track with set goals, stabilizes a set schedule, and provides a framework in which repetition for specific tasks or activities can successfully be accomplished. The need for a set routine does not magically disappear when the Holidays appear.

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Brain Injury – Surviving Holiday Stress

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For some people, the holidays can be an exciting time revolving around the hustle and bustle of baking, entertaining, welcoming out-of-town guests, shopping, and more. For others, the holidays can be a time of loneliness and isolation. Whether it is positive or not-so-positive, the holidays are usually a source of stress for all. For a survivor of a brain injury, however, the holidays can feel even more overwhelming and can lead to new daily challenges that can make not just the holiday season a struggle, but can also affect day-to-day living. The following tips can be useful for all individuals battling seasonal stressors, but can be especially good survival tips for those who have survived a brain injury (and their caregivers).

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Cognitive Dimension TBI Improvement

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A traumatic brain injury greatly affects the cognitive thought process. Every aspect of thought can be challenged, e.g., attention, memory, reasoning ability, language.

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