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Changes in social skills after a brain injury or stroke can lead to difficulty communicating, making and sustaining friendships, and interacting in social situations. These blog articles disucss the impact of brain injury on social skills and give suggestions for coping.

Simon’s TBI Story, a Guest Blog (March, 2020)

This blog post is a short firsthand account (from Simon L.) that was shared in response to another blog post on the Lash & Associates Publishing website. It was well-crafted, and very enlightening…and well worth sharing!

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Brain Injury Awareness Month – Find Your Tribe!

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To celebrate brain injury awareness month in the USA, this blog post encourages TBI survivors to “find their tribe” and encourage each other, as well as encouraging others in their TBI journey.

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Five Good Choices to Make After a TBI

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After a traumatic brain injury (TBI) there are plenty of things to learn, relearn, and experience before progress can be measured. This article covers 5 positive steps toward making progress as a TBI survivor. There are also some links to product that directly relate to the article – of different prices, and dealing with similar issues.

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You Did That on Purpose! – Misinterpretations and Anger after Brain Injury

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You Did That on Purpose!  Misinterpretations and Anger after Brain Injury   By Dawn Neumann, Ph.D., FACRM   Imagine that you are waiting in line at the store and someone cuts in front of you.  A) Do you think the person cut in front of you on purpose or was trying to be mean? B) […]

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Survivors Speak about Recovery and Acceptance

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When a life-changer like TBI occurs, moving forward and acceptance are key parts of rebuilding. This blog post discusses the myth of recovery, rising again, recalculating, family dynamics and more…a great resource with plentiful links to other articles and useful products to help along the way…for survivors, caregivers, and more.

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News Release: A TBI Survivor Journey of 16-Years

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Lash &  Associates Publishing (www.lapublishing.com) proudly presents a new publication for survivors, caregivers, and professionals working with survivors: MY BRAIN AND I By Jennifer Callaghan Jennifer shares the triumphs and gains she’s experienced over a 16-year period after sustaining severe traumatic brain injury.  In poignant detail, she writes of her struggles, the many obstacles, and […]

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Why Write a Book About TBI? by Jennifer Callaghan

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I began by writing a few words, then a few sentences, and then, whole paragraphs. The more I wrote, the better I felt. I wanted, no — I needed to explain what it felt like inside the lonely head of a person with a brain injury and how the world looked.

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Relocation Rebound – Dealing with Mild TBI and Stress Because of Moving, by C.C. LeBlanc

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C.C. LeBlanc, a mild TBI survivor, has gone through relocation stresses and suggests that before you move, carefully examine your needs for a meaningful quality of life. Almost everything you have developed in your life to be functional will be disrupted. You need to be prepared for stress, that your TBI will be aggravated, and your coping skills will be challenged. C.C. LeBlanc would like to share some guidelines based on her own experiences.

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Disinhibition and Meeting People after Brain Injury

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My disinhibition after TBI exposed me to real dangers that I was not aware of. Imagine being an adult suddenly being told by police, “Don’t give strangers your home address.” I learned that in pre-school, and here I had let an older man I hardly knew drive me home. He started emailing to ask if he could care for me and to criticize me for doing things without telling him first. (I’d just met him. I hadn’t even given him my email address.) I had friends and counselors intervene to get me to stop hanging out with people who sucked my life out of me. They guilt tripped me into hanging out and then overpowered me with manipulative stories and comments. I thought I was not being taken advantage of because I hadn’t been before. I was wrong.

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Social Dimension TBI Improvement

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Social interactions with other people can be very difficult for a TBI survivor. A person’s personality is the way he interacts with others and the way he responds to various situations. Brain injury can often have cause a person to have heightened emotions and react to situations with anxiety and lack of control. Therefore, a person’s social response to various situations is probably one of the most noticeable dimensions in behavior.

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