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Depression after brain injury can have many causes. It can be caused by medical changes as well as social, financial, and emotional changes. Depression can affect survivors, family members and caregivers. Recognizing the symptoms of depression is the first step toward getting treatment. These blog articles discuss the impact of depression and offer hope.

TBI Is A Thief…and Post-TBI Grief Is Rarely Brief

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Grief after TBI is a universal condition – and finding your way through is sometimes “one step forward, two steps back.” This post shares some ideas for dealing with grief, for survivors and family members, friends, etc.

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One is The Loneliest Number

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Finding supportive, positive and encouraging people to surround you after TBI can be difficult – sometimes it’s out of our control. Working to be your own best supporter could be your own best option. Feeling alone in your situation can fuel you to strive even harder…make the decision to work on improvement every day!

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There’s always hope… Encouragement after TBI

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There’s always hope… Encouragement after TBI   By Bill Herrin   My dad would often tell me not to get discouraged, and as a young man, I didn’t understand why…sometimes it made me frustrated. What he knew (that I didn’t at the time) was that he was preparing me for discouraging times in my life. […]

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You Did That on Purpose! – Misinterpretations and Anger after Brain Injury

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You Did That on Purpose!  Misinterpretations and Anger after Brain Injury   By Dawn Neumann, Ph.D., FACRM   Imagine that you are waiting in line at the store and someone cuts in front of you.  A) Do you think the person cut in front of you on purpose or was trying to be mean? B) […]

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News Release: A TBI Survivor Journey of 16-Years

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Lash &  Associates Publishing (www.lapublishing.com) proudly presents a new publication for survivors, caregivers, and professionals working with survivors: MY BRAIN AND I By Jennifer Callaghan Jennifer shares the triumphs and gains she’s experienced over a 16-year period after sustaining severe traumatic brain injury.  In poignant detail, she writes of her struggles, the many obstacles, and […]

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Why Write a Book About TBI? by Jennifer Callaghan

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I began by writing a few words, then a few sentences, and then, whole paragraphs. The more I wrote, the better I felt. I wanted, no — I needed to explain what it felt like inside the lonely head of a person with a brain injury and how the world looked.

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The REAL Story about Mild Brain Injury and Concussion By Marilyn Lash, MSW

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The brain is a complex and vulnerable organ. As you can see, there is nothing mild about an injury to the brain. But by becoming more knowledgeable about mild brain injury, you can become an informed consumer of health services, effective health care provider, supportive family member, caring friend or colleague. It can happen to anyone.

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A Living Grief by Katherine A. Kimes, Ed.D.

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Katherine A. Kimes experienced the trauma of a brain injury at the age of sixteen. Her mother became the primary caretaker. This is their story in brief. Katherine gives insight into her perception and viewpoint and shows there is a need for the survivor and other family members to understand the ongoing legacy of a TBI.

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When All Seems Hopeless! Hold onto Hope by William C. Jarvis, Ed.D.

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Hope! As a brain injury survivor, Bill Jarvis knows how difficult it can be to hold on to hope when so much has been lost in one’s life and relationships. But he offers both hope and encouragement to survivors that it is possible to sustain hope and to build a positive future.

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Ambiguous Loss Wounds Veterans and Family by Marilyn Lash, MSW

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Ambiguous loss can not be seen but it is real and felt by combat veterans, their families and caregivers who struggle with the invisible wounds of war. The story of a World War 2 veteran Louis Zamperini illustrates how even the most strong willed and courageous combat veteran found another war at home with chronic PTSD that almost destroyed him. How much has changed with our returning veterans today?

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