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Living with a brain injury can be stressful for the survivor, family and caregiver. Many symptoms and changes caused by the brain injury can worsen or increase with stress. Holidays and anniversaries can be especially stressful with memories of what has been lost and altered expectations. These blog articles explain various methods for coping with stress after brain injury.

Why Write a Book About TBI? by Jennifer Callaghan

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I began by writing a few words, then a few sentences, and then, whole paragraphs. The more I wrote, the better I felt. I wanted, no — I needed to explain what it felt like inside the lonely head of a person with a brain injury and how the world looked.

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The REAL Story about Mild Brain Injury and Concussion By Marilyn Lash, MSW

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The brain is a complex and vulnerable organ. As you can see, there is nothing mild about an injury to the brain. But by becoming more knowledgeable about mild brain injury, you can become an informed consumer of health services, effective health care provider, supportive family member, caring friend or colleague. It can happen to anyone.

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Relocation Rebound – Dealing with Mild TBI and Stress Because of Moving, by C.C. LeBlanc

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C.C. LeBlanc, a mild TBI survivor, has gone through relocation stresses and suggests that before you move, carefully examine your needs for a meaningful quality of life. Almost everything you have developed in your life to be functional will be disrupted. You need to be prepared for stress, that your TBI will be aggravated, and your coping skills will be challenged. C.C. LeBlanc would like to share some guidelines based on her own experiences.

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Maintaining Structure and Routine during the Holidays after a Traumatic Brain Injury

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The Holiday Season, although typically merry and festive, brings added pressures to our daily routine. With shopping, increased food preparation, house guests, frequent visitors, financial stress, and more demands on time, the inevitable occurs; A change in routine.

Change, although it tends to be a good thing as it helps one become, too much change and in a short time span can produce negative results for Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Survivors. Too much change could potentially result in: back tracking on earlier progress that was made and/or getting out of a set regiment thus having to re-learn areas that were previously mastered. Having a daily routine helps one stay on track with set goals, stabilizes a set schedule, and provides a framework in which repetition for specific tasks or activities can successfully be accomplished. The need for a set routine does not magically disappear when the Holidays appear.

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Brain Injury – Surviving Holiday Stress

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For some people, the holidays can be an exciting time revolving around the hustle and bustle of baking, entertaining, welcoming out-of-town guests, shopping, and more. For others, the holidays can be a time of loneliness and isolation. Whether it is positive or not-so-positive, the holidays are usually a source of stress for all. For a survivor of a brain injury, however, the holidays can feel even more overwhelming and can lead to new daily challenges that can make not just the holiday season a struggle, but can also affect day-to-day living. The following tips can be useful for all individuals battling seasonal stressors, but can be especially good survival tips for those who have survived a brain injury (and their caregivers).

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Holidays after Brain Injury

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If you are a brain injury survivor, struggling to cope with daily life, special events can cause an almost intolerable amount of stress and anxiety. You are already dealing with extreme fatigue and have the full time job of rehabilitating from a brain injury. Financial situations and family relationships are often strained. Similar feelings may apply to caregivers as well. Managing the holidays may seem impossible – but there are some strategies you can use to help keep the joy in the season.

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Know Your Limits after Brain Injury

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One of the difficulties in life is to know our limits. Following a brain injury, it is extremely important to know your limits so that you can manage stress, anger outbursts, and emotional and physical fatigue. Yes, it is important to build up stamina and to work hard in recovery, but pacing yourself to increase your abilities will actually work in your favour

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Six Stress Resilience Skills for Family Caregivers

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Resilient people share certain characteristics. Research has shown that these characteristics include commitment, control, community, calmness, and challenge. Here are a few suggestions to cultivate your stress resilience while caring for a family member after brain injury.

I think that the most important change you can make is to believe that you deserve to prioritize time for your mind, body, and spirit every day. Caring for yourself is a basic human right. You have inherent worth, in addition to the services you provide for your loved one. Our actions follow our beliefs, so practice talking to yourself in ways that promote self-worth and respect.

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