Category Description:

 

Being a caregiver for a spouse, parent, child, or sibling with a brain injury can be a long journey with many rewards, stresses and conflicts. While so much care and attention focuses on the person who has been injured, the needs and feelings of caregivers are often overlooked or ignored. These blog articles focus on understanding the dynamics of caregivers, the challenges faced by caregivers over time, and strategies to support and inform caregivers.

TBI and PTSD affects wives as well as service members and veterans

post thumbnail

Weekend retreats help the women and wives of wounded warriors injured in Iraq and Afghanistan explore their own needs for support, help and encouragement as they deal with the emotional trauma as the effects of war come home with their husbands. Marilyn Lash is part of a team conducting retreats across the country and shares what she has learned from these women about the emotional aftermath of wartime injuries on marriage and parenting.

Read More

Compassion Fatigue: When Caring Hurts Too Much – Part Two

post thumbnail

Prevention is the best strategy. At the heart of compassion resilience you’ll find intention, connection, and the ability to shift from a stress response to a more relaxed response. These skills won’t take away the problems you face, but they may help you to be a stronger and healthier caregiver.

Read More

Compassion Fatigue: When Caring Hurts Too Much

post thumbnail

In Part One of this post I’ll give you some information about compassion fatigue. In Part Two (next week), I’ll explain some good strategies to prevent or treat compassion fatigue. Caregiving for someone who has severe injuries or medical problems can be very stressful. Learning ways to manage the stress and emotional demands can protect your health and help you be a better caregiver.

Compassion fatigue is a form of severe stress that comes from caring for a person who is very seriously ill or injured. The person’s injuries can be physical or psychological. Often there is a combination. By learning how to recognize the warning signs of compassion fatigue, you can take care of yourself and reduce the emotional and physical stress of caregiving.

Read More

Caregiver Distress

post thumbnail

Family caregivers of people with brain injury face stress, often intense, that can last for months and years. A new study suggests that the both emotional dysfunction and emotional health of a stressed caregiver can affect the recovery and rehabilitation of the injured person. Fortunately, there are many easy and inexpensive ways to relieve the stress associated with caregiving — including journaling, of course! — so that everyone can feel better. See more in this week’s post in Journal After Brain Injury, as well as prompts to help you deal with the stress.

Read More

Stress Resilience for Family Caregivers

post thumbnail

Caring for a loved one who has a brain injury leads you on a journey full of challenges, losses, rewards, and adjustments. You might be a caregiver for a short time but, more often, the survivor will require assistance, direct care, or ongoing rehabilitation for years. Preparing for your journey involves packing a suitcase full of skills and attitudes that will help you be healthy, whole, and resilient.

Read More

Keep the Peace

post thumbnail

“First keep the peace within yourself, then you can also bring peace to others.”

~ Thomas Kempis, Catholic Monk (1380-1471)

We all understand what it means to keep the peace in our communities and in the world. It’s not only important, but it is also the law. However, keeping the peace within ourselves should be equally as important and be second nature to us.

Read More

Don’t you just Hate it!

post thumbnail

Don’t you just hate it when you are treated like you are not ‘intelligent’ enough by someone, or that you do not know what it is you are talking about–especially when you not only KNOW but LIVE the very thing you ARE talking about!?

Read More

What is “Normal” for Family Caregivers after Brain Injury?

post thumbnail

Being a caregiver can be both an incredibly stressful and rewarding job. But when a family member – a spouse, son or daughter, parent or sibling – becomes the primary caregiver, there is an emotional component that is added to the physical aspect of giving care. No matter how much we try to be objective or distance ourselves to get the job done, caring for a parent, spouse, child or siblings stirs up many mixed emotions.

Many of us expect and willingly accept being caregivers when a family member is first injured or ill. As the person leaves the hospital or rehabilitation program, we are prepared to give additional help or supervision when our family member first comes home. But we expect it will be temporary – until the person recovers or regains strength – just as has happened in the past.

Read More

Caregivers – Do Something Nice for Yourself this Holiday Season

post thumbnail

Caregiving is extremely taxing. People do it out of love and they want to take care of their loved one, but the strain and toll it takes on the caregiver’s life is real and should not be overlooked. I know we are raised to NOT be selfish, but sometimes that is exactly what we need to do. Carving out some time alone is often the only way to recharge your batteries. And, we know how exhausting the holiday season can be so as a caregiver, you may feel it even more so.

Read More

Marriage and Traumatic Brain Injury: Who is the Caregiver Here?

post thumbnail

I guess for Bill and I, the first thing we had to get over when he was injured was the Traumatic part of the equation. I am sure we have all had trauma in our life, so you know that it keeps coming back from time to time. PTSD, is a real problem and many of us suffer from it, both from TBI and our previous life experiences.

Read More