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The brains of children and adolescents are still developing, so an injury can have both immediate and long-term effects on youths. It is easier to see the visible physical changes that can result from a childhood injury.  But it is the less visible but critically important changes in a child’s cognition – the ability to think and learn – that can affect a studen’ts ability to function in the classroom and learn in school. These blog articles help parents, educators and clinicians understand the unique needs of children and adolescents with TBI.

Educating Students with Brain Injury (TBI): The Big Picture for Schools

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Students with traumatic brain injury or TBI are often unidentified or underserved in schools as this diagnosis is still mistakenly considered a low incidence disability under special education. Dr. Katherine Kimes looks beyond the individual needs of students with TBI and discusses the “big picture” of why schools need to address this student population more effectively. She explains why parents and teachers must jointly plan and collaborate to provide effective service coordination for a student with a TBI.

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TBI Student Survivor and School Success

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That last day of school in June felt liberating. I had the whole summer to recover and possibly a chance to go back to school full time in the fall. However, what I did not realize was that the stress was just beginning. Except for being tutored in two subjects a few days a week at school, I had not done any work at all from October-June. I had basically missed my entire sophomore year (I finished English, though) and I had to make it up somehow in one summer.

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Understanding and Preventing Brain Injury in Children

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Michael Pines founded the Law Offices of Michael Pines, APC, in San Diego in 1992. Having worked with brain injury victims for over 20 years, Mike sees first-hand how incredibly devastating brain injury can be for individuals and families. He is an accident and injury prevention expert in San Diego, and on a campaign to end senseless injury one blog at a time.

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Returning to School after Brain Injury

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I was finally able to return to school part time in January, but with much apprehension. I had just started to put the days of the week and the months of the year in order and I was working on being able to walk better in a straight line and stand still without having to grab onto something.

I was still extremely symptomatic, and did not feel well at all, and consequently, I was unable to be my old self. One really cannot understand the frustration of this until they experience it first hand. I am usually a very energetic and upbeat person, but now my personality was completely flat and emotionless. I simply could not be “present” in any situation. I had damaged my brain and had been isolated from the world for three months. I was nothing but nerves and I was feeling self-conscious. Social situations of any kind were stressful. I could feel myself wanting to socialize and be with my friends, and take part in things, but physically, I was in such pain and completely exhausted, that I just could not do it. I could hardly follow a conversation and many people talking at once were a real bother to my head.

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In-School Strategies Can Help with Students with Memory after TBI

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Many students with traumatic brain injury or TBI have cognitive deficits, but memory can be especially challenging. Dr. Katherine Kimes explains the importance of matching the student’s learning style with cognitive strategies to help and support the student in the classroom. She provides a detailed list of educational strategies that teachers can use to help the child or adolescent who has challenges with memory and comprehension due to a brain injury.

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The First 3 Months as a Teenager with TBI

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I spent the first 3 months of my concussion lying in bed at home, in a dark room, and on complete brain rest. This brain rest meant that I could not watch TV, use a computer, phone, text, read anything, do any sort of homework or exercise. In other words, I could just sleep and lie in bed.

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Living a New Normal – Part One

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My name is Madeline Uretsky, and I am a 16 year old high school student/athlete; I play soccer, ice hockey, and track, am an active member in my school/class, an honor roll student, and a very positive person. In a matter of seconds, all of this changed for me. You never think it’s going to happen to you.

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Managing Behavior in Children after Brain Injury or TBI

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Managing the behavior of students with traumatic brain injury can be challenging and frustrating for teachers, therapists and parents. Katherine Kimes explains four types of behavior management strategies that can be used in rehabilitation as well as at home and in school. By understanding how to identify changes in behaviors that are related to the brain injury or TBI and then measuring those behaviors, educators and therapists can develop and implement a plan to encourage positive adaptive behaviors and to decrease “problem” behaviors in children and adolescents.

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The Astronaut Ballerina After Brain Injury – A Children’s Story

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My story “The Astronaut Ballerina and the Do Not Forget List” is a story aimed at children who have a parent with TBI. The story was written for a class project where we had to create a children’s book describing trauma. I chose TBI because it affects so many people’s lives, and because, in my research, I discovered that there are not very many children’s stories discussing the issues that arise from having a parent with TBI.

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Seizures after Brain Injury

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5:56 am 9:52 am 4:40 pm 1 minute to 1.45+ minutes

These were the times Samuel had seizures yesterday and for how long.

They started early in the morning at home and continued the rest of the day. They were full clonic tonic seizures just like before.

The change this time was there were 3 in less than 12 hours, he took longer to regain consciousness and he was throwing up the first two.

Our family doctor got through to our Winnipeg doctors and it was decided that Sam’s med’s would be increased (thankfully we had room to move there) and that only if he seizures again after this will we go to Winnipeg.

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