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A brain injury is a family injury. Whether you are a spouse, parent, sibling, or child, each of you is affected in some way. The losses of brain injury are more than medical and physical changes in how a person functions, speaks or walks. The impact of a brain injury changes over time for families from the initial shock to the slow process of rebuilding relationships and reshaping the future.

The changes and losses for a family are many, from changes in roles, responsibilities, communication, finances, to changes in friends, jobs, and income. These blog articles offer experiences of families, as well as perspectives by clinicians, on how families have been affected along with coping strategies for the long journey of brain injury.

Grieving Losses due to TBI by Denise Boggs

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Grieving Losses Due to TBI By Denise Boggs & Debbie Leonhard, M.Div., M.A., www.livingwatersministry.com A person with a Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) faces many challenges and losses. The caregivers are also having to face their own losses and challenges.  When we grieve, we are facing the pain and sorrow of the losses, touching them, experiencing […]

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Acceptance of TBI by Pamela Taylor

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Acceptance of TBI’s Hard News: Words Nobody Wants to Hear!! by Pamela Taylor Hearing words nobody wants to hear! Yesterday, I heard the words that nobody wants to hear. “Pam, you have known that you have a traumatic brain injury. We have tried therapies and medication. Your progress has been good. But, we are at […]

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Changes After Brain Injury-Part 1 by Donna O’Donnell Figurski

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Inside the Brain: Changes in Behaviors and Emotions After Brain Injury by Donna O’Donnell Figurski Every brain injury is different. When injury occurs to any part of the brain, there is going to be a change. The part of the brain damaged determines the kind of symptoms experienced. Because the brain is a complex organ, some damage […]

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The REAL Story about Mild Brain Injury and Concussion By Marilyn Lash, MSW

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The brain is a complex and vulnerable organ. As you can see, there is nothing mild about an injury to the brain. But by becoming more knowledgeable about mild brain injury, you can become an informed consumer of health services, effective health care provider, supportive family member, caring friend or colleague. It can happen to anyone.

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Heartfelt Support for Family Caregivers by Barbara Stahura, CJF

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Family caregivers face multiple emotional and physical demands. This article shares the experiences of two families who faced these challenges from the TBI suffered by their veteran spouse. Hearts of Valor is one organization providing support for family caregivers dealing with the effects of TBI and PTSD in wounded veterans.

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Flowers and Brain Injury – Ruth Ann Bartels Finds Hope and Beauty Again

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Honey I Smell the Flowers were the last words Ruth Ann Bartels spoke to her husband as they were traveling to warmer climates for their winter vacation. That was just before she got the phone call that her daughter Michelle had been badly injured in a car crash and was in an ambulance. The book title chosen by Bartels reflects the journey of this mother – and so many other families – to find hope and beauty again after witnessing the devastation that brain trauma can cause.

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Runaway Spending after Brain Injury by Thomas Henson Jr. and Carol Svec

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Impulsive spending, poor judgement and cognitive impairments mean that brain injury finances can spiral out of control leading to financial disaster for TBI survivors. Thomas Henson and Carol Svec share legal advice and steps that families can take to protect survivors from financial ruin.

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The Journey of Grief after Brain Injury by Janelle Breese Biagioni

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Grief after brain injury is a journey for families, survivors and caregivers. It involves loss, bereavement, grieving and mourning and life can feel suspended during the early stages of shock and grief. Janelle Breese Biagioni explains various types of grief and mourning, including ambiguous grief and extraordinary mourning. By understanding the grief process, families can regain a sense of hope.

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What Do You Expect of Your Family after Brain Injury? by Rosemary Rawlins

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Rosemary Rawlins recalls that everything that was “normal” about her family and the routine of their daily life was so taken for granted and then it was shaken to the core after her husband’s brain injury. How do you face the uncertainty of the future and how do you make a new life plan when it is unclear what the meaning of “recovery” will be?

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Talking with Your Spouse or Charlie Brown’s Teacher? Miscommunication in Couples after Brain Injury by Dawn Neumann, PhD

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Couples after brain injury often find that their relationship changes in many ways, particularly their ability to communicate with each other. One partner often feels frustrated, angry, guilty and even avoids the other. Good communication is the foundation for a good relationship. Without it, relationships are as vulnerable as a house of cards. Miscommunication after a brain injury tends to revolve around the couple’s inability to share and understand each other’s emotions and needs. Dr. Dawn Neumann gives couples strategies on how to communicate more effectively.

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