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A brain injury is a family injury. Whether you are a spouse, parent, sibling, or child, each of you is affected in some way. The losses of brain injury are more than medical and physical changes in how a person functions, speaks or walks. The impact of a brain injury changes over time for families from the initial shock to the slow process of rebuilding relationships and reshaping the future.

The changes and losses for a family are many, from changes in roles, responsibilities, communication, finances, to changes in friends, jobs, and income. These blog articles offer experiences of families, as well as perspectives by clinicians, on how families have been affected along with coping strategies for the long journey of brain injury.

Children and Grief after Brain Injury

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Children cannot be fooled. They know when something is wrong or when something “bad” has happened. As parents, we want to protect them and it is natural to want to keep them from experiencing pain and suffering. However, to avoid discussing with them how you feel or to not let them see you cry isn’t protecting them. Allowing them to see you cry because your heart is broken is not weak or shameful. Letting them know that they are safe in the midst of chaos and that you will all get through this together… is a gift.

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Spiritual Insights for the Long Haul

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I am drawn by the idea of surrender to God’s will, but the pull on my will, and my consciousness is often from all the “good” things I expect of myself, and perceptions of what I must do as the mother of Brian, my son who is a brain injury survivor. What of these activities that occupy me are God’s will and what are my own plans, my own agenda, or even the world’s agenda?

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Daddy’s Little Princess

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I was and still am (and always will be) a huge Daddy’s Girl. My dad always told me he never wanted a boy. He wanted a princess to spoil, and that is what he did.We were more like best friends than father and daughter. Even though there were over a thousand kilometers between us, we were close as could be. It was never out of the ordinary to receive a phone call at 2 in the afternoon and it was my dad at work. He had heard a joke and had to share it with me. He would surprise me with visits, calls and gifts all the time. He was my best friend.

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My Family and Brain Injury

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Do you ever get the feeling like you KNOW there is something not quite right but you just can’t put your finger on it!? I am sure everyone has or does… It can’t be just me… can it!?

I felt like that for about 10 years with my husband. OH! Please don’t get me wrong it wasn’t that I thought he was secretly with the CIA or KGB (that would have been way easier to find out I am sure!) He is a great guy that works hard, will lend a hand to anyone that needs it, is willing to drop everything to help someone and is always the first in line to set up fun for the family…

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Marriage and Brain Injury

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Sometimes, I just sit and cry. That’s when Bill is in the hospital mostly. People ask me how I have the strength to do what I do. “Caring for a spouse with your husband’s problems must be very difficult.”

It is. But living with any spouse with any disability has to be difficult. I am not alone in the caring for a spouse world. Brain injury and the loss of so many abilities that one had before is confusing and challenging for both the survivor and the spouse. The inability to use a microwave or stove or even read a recipe to make for dinner is very hard on Bill. He was a wonderful cook, and I miss his cooking. He misses much more and has learned to accept my cooking and helps me as he can.

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Your Average Everyday TBI Family! Yeah right!!

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It all began around 1:30pm and Dennis phoned me at home(he was at work) to ask me to go pick up Sam from the hospital in town. He had been phoned and told that Sam had hit his head and would probably want to come home since it may be a concussion. So I packed up Hannah and Zac (who were then 9 and 11yrs) and off we went to the hospital.

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Marriage and Traumatic Brain Injury

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When Bill was released from the hospital several months after his brain injury in June 2006, he was still on medication that really played havoc with his mind. He wasn’t sure where he was, what he was safe to do, and what had happened. Over the next few months that medication was regulated.

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