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badge2Living with brain injury, whether it is caused by a traumatic injury, stroke, tumor, infection, or illness, is a lifelong journey for survivors, families, and caregivers. The Brain Injury Blog is about more than the care, treatment and rehabilitation of those who survive brain injury. It is about the journey of brain injury from the perspectives of those who live with it as well as those who provide care, treatment and support. Survival is just the first step in living with brain injury. Please join us in the journey of hope after brain injury.

We Are More Than Our Brain Injuries by Cheryl Green

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Cheryl Green has met people who say some of us over-identify with our brain injuries. They complain that all some of us ever talk about is our brain injury. But it’s not for others to say. A brain injury can affect all parts of your life in the present and the future. If it’s your identity, that’s wonderful. If it’s what you want to talk about, that’s wonderful too. It’s not like we’re the only people on the planet who get really into talking about one thing.

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Family Chaos or Cohesion? by Rosemary Rawlins

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We grow up in our families and we come to know what to expect from day to day. Family routines, schedules, rituals, and traditions reinforce our sense of security and belonging. Shared values, love, and trust bind us. So it follows that when something unexpected and devastating happens to one family member, each member of the family is profoundly affected.

Finding a new family rhythm after one member has sustained a brain injury can be challenging at best or chaotic at worst, because brain injury causes immediate and drastic changes for all family members.

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Meditation Brings Psychological Healing by William C. Jarvis

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Traumatic Brain Injury is often very discouraging on a daily basis. A TBI Survivor needs comfort in the journey of healing. Meditation offers the opportunity for gaining inner strength and peace. It is this strength that is often needed as one travels the journey of healing. People of all faiths can find comfort and strengths in the scriptures.

It is this emphasis on the peace and assurance that all meditations and faith bring to the individual that is the premise I offer. The individual process may be different, but the act of one’s implementation of his/her cultural beliefs will maximize psychological healing.

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Holiday Stress – Just Don’t Say Anything Please by Jodi Ginter

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Jodi Ginter lost her Dad when he had a severe traumatic brain injury years ago but he survived and is living – as a very different person. The recent holidays reminded her of how much has been lost for him and for their father/daughter relationship as painful memories resurfaced. How have you coped with the holidays?

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Preventing and Healing Compassion Fatigue by Janet M. Cromer, RN, LMHC, CCFE

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Compassion fatigue is a form of complete exhaustion that results from the prolonged stress of caring for a very sick or traumatized person. Compassion fatigue depletes our physical, emotional, and spiritual reserves, so interventions must replenish those dimensions. It even interferes with how the body and mind function. Living with this extreme stress is dangerous because it can contribute to medical illness, mood disturbances, behavior changes, and substance abuse. Compassion fatigue builds up slowly as the stress response stays in overdrive for weeks, or even months.

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Modalities For TBI Improvement by William C. Jarvis, Ed.D.

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Traumatic Brain Injury improvement can be maximized when the TBI survivor uses strategies at home. Bill Jarvis has developed specific strategies for the Jarvis Rehabilitation Method that center around different modalities of effort. These modalities are: Speaking-Hearing; Seeing; Feeling; Thinking; Experiencing. He explains how and why these strategies have both direct and indirect benefits for continuing rehabilitation and progress over time.

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Cooking with Brain Injury by Cheryl Green and William Alton

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This short film by Cheryl Green infuses humor into daily struggles of life after traumatic brain injury. Cooking with Brain Injury shows how the ordinary task of cooking can become a challenging puzzle for the survivor of a brain injury. True events are shown in style of a network TV cooking show where the cooks are stymied by a piece of salmon and their own unpredictable obstacles.

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Wounded Families in the Aftermath of PTSD: The Invisible Emotional Wounds by Marilyn Lash, M.S.W.

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For so many returning service members and veterans dealing with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), the question may be, “Are your emotions ready for intimacy?” Sex and intimacy are very different. While sex is a physical act, intimacy is an emotional connection. loss of intimacy. Tt is the elephant in the room that too often is not discussed with family, friends, physicians, or counselors. When the connection between loss of intimacy and PTSD is not understood, too many partners “take it personally” and feel unloved, unworthy, unattractive, and rejected. Whether the demands for sex are constant or sex is avoided for long periods, loss of intimacy can undermine the very core of a couple’s relationship.

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My Concussion Changed Me By Catz LeBlanc

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Catz LeBlanc describes the impact of a concussion she sustained as a sports injury that was soon after compounded by a car crash leaving her unable to work or function from day to day. Suddenly she was not the competent independent woman she knew but found herself struggling to understand what had happened to her. Losing her friends and family and her job was tough enough, but losing her ability to think clearly and negotiate the cognitive challenges of daily life was devastating. Her reflections and insights about what it means to have a brain injury and the misperceptions of others about “what was wrong with me” have led her to asking many new questions.

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Helping Children with TBI Succeed in School by Janet Tyler, PhD

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Children and adolescents with traumatic brain injury (TBI) often face many cognitive, academic, and behavioral challenges after their injury. New difficulties in school may arise as school work becomes more complex with each passing grade. By working closely with teachers and educators, parents can help ensure that their child has the best possible chance of succeeding in school. Dr. Janet Tyler discusses how parents and teachers can collaborate to learn about brain injury, how good parenting skills at home can make a difference, and the benefits of tutoring. Parents and educators will find this article practical and helpful.

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