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badge2Living with brain injury, whether it is caused by a traumatic injury, stroke, tumor, infection, or illness, is a lifelong journey for survivors, families, and caregivers. The Brain Injury Blog is about more than the care, treatment and rehabilitation of those who survive brain injury. It is about the journey of brain injury from the perspectives of those who live with it as well as those who provide care, treatment and support. Survival is just the first step in living with brain injury. Please join us in the journey of hope after brain injury.

Who Will Cry For Me? The Brain Injured in America

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Down the road a little ways from a large ranch in Texas, a cry goes out from wailing mothers and their supporters over the deaths of loved ones in an un-just war, in a land far away- but- who will cry for me?

I ‘died’, twice, in the med-evac chopper on the way to a hospital after being T-boned by a speeding police car coming toward me on an emergency call. The medics dragged me back each time I ‘died’ and gave me back my life? I have wished many times since that they would have just nailed the lid on my coffin and let me go in peace! For now, I face a new ‘death’ almost daily, such as the ‘death’ of a job I never knew I had and now can never do again! A nail for my lid if you please.

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Traumatic Brain Injury Injustices by David Grant

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Sitting across from my dad last Sunday at a local eatery, he shared something that caught my ear. “The principal of our elementary school was just fired,” he said as casually as if talking about the weather.

He went on to say that she had a recent skiing accident, hit her head, and was having trouble with her memory. Students names now escaped her. Teachers she had known and work with daily were also among the unremembered. And the town took action; action in the from of termination.

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Journey of Reflection

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An old man was walking down a long, lonely road one day on a journey he knew must soon come to an end. As the days passed slowly by, his mind was reflecting upon his journey thus far. There have been many trying times and a lot of uncertainties along the way, but there were many happy and joyous times as well.

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Now School after Brain Injury

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Towards the end of the summer, I started to think about how my first day back at school would be with my brain injury aka the “invisible injury”, and how the year would go in general. Would I be able to make it through my first class? A whole school day? Do homework after school? Have a regular social life? Keep up with my schoolwork? There were so many things to consider and think about upon my return. I had missed a year of school and still had a brain injury. This was going to be a challenge.

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Death Unwelcome Visitor After Brain Injury

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Death was once again at my door, paying me an unwelcome visit! He was no stranger to me as this was his forth attempt to gain entrance through my weakened, bruised and battered door for the purpose of snuffing out my life. But I had the will to live, to survive by resisting all his efforts to break down the door that had so miraculously denied all his previous attempts!

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Healing Your Heart After a Brain Injury

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Winter can be a tough season for anyone but it can be exceptionally distressing for brain injury survivors. On top of struggling with the typical “winter blues”, brain injury survivors are struggling with a fundamental life crisis. Who am I and what is my value if I can’t do what I used to do, if my friends aren’t my friends anymore and I am a problem for my family?

Something you may not realize is that there is commonly a grieving process associated with healing from a brain injury. You have lost much of your “sense of self”. You don’t know how much you will get back and you may not know for a long time. There are often secondary losses as well – jobs, income, homes, friends, even family. These changes and losses all have a profound effect on a survivor, as well as their family and friends.

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Disinhibition and Meeting People after Brain Injury

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My disinhibition after TBI exposed me to real dangers that I was not aware of. Imagine being an adult suddenly being told by police, “Don’t give strangers your home address.” I learned that in pre-school, and here I had let an older man I hardly knew drive me home. He started emailing to ask if he could care for me and to criticize me for doing things without telling him first. (I’d just met him. I hadn’t even given him my email address.) I had friends and counselors intervene to get me to stop hanging out with people who sucked my life out of me. They guilt tripped me into hanging out and then overpowered me with manipulative stories and comments. I thought I was not being taken advantage of because I hadn’t been before. I was wrong.

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Practical Caregiving Tips To Advocate For Your Hospitalized Brain Injury Patient – Part 3

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This article is part three of a three part series that will help you step into an advocacy role for your brain injury patient, feel more confident about your role as a caregiver, and communicate effectively with medical professionals. These tips and actions are practical and provide real life advice to help you navigate through the countless tests, doctors, nurses, therapists, medicines and other medical professionals and new terminology. Moving forward, accept that you have a steep learning curve and apply yourself persistently.

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Brain Injury Pancakes

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When I do something well that used to be really hard, I am so proud. But if I get too proud, I call it “being sassy.” That’s when my logic has gone out the window. For example, if I finally finish a Sudoku, I might then decide I have no more brain injury impairments, and I will go for a run. I’m dizzy within a few blocks, and then a loud truck goes by and frightens me. I turn around and come home, head held low. Oh yeah, I think to myself. Sudoku is Sudoku. Jogging in a noisy, busy place is something very different.

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Three Fun Journaling Techniques to Open Your Heart after Brain Injury

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If you have a brain injury or are a family caregiver, you know that your life encompasses much more than caregiving and TBI. It’s important to make your life as well-rounded as you can. If you journal (and I hope you do!), you know that inspiration for your writing can come from anywhere. You’re much more than a caregiver for a person with a brain injury or TBI.. But when you need a jumpstart, you can try these three methods for fun and enlightening writing sessions. They will spark creativity, open up your heart, and provide a look into your life. You’ll need to do a little prep work, which can also be fun, but then you’ll be set for many journaling sessions, alone or in a group.

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