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badge2Living with brain injury, whether it is caused by a traumatic injury, stroke, tumor, infection, or illness, is a lifelong journey for survivors, families, and caregivers. The Brain Injury Blog is about more than the care, treatment and rehabilitation of those who survive brain injury. It is about the journey of brain injury from the perspectives of those who live with it as well as those who provide care, treatment and support. Survival is just the first step in living with brain injury. Please join us in the journey of hope after brain injury.

Where Are They Now?

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After we moved into our new quarters, we had to say goodbye to some old friends who were integral to our growth and the all-round upbeat atmosphere in the office. Briefly, here is an update of what they are currently doing:

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Teens and Sex after Brain Injury

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Last week, my husband and I went to our first high school football game in our home town. It’s been a long time – I won’t even tell you how long – since either of us have been teenagers. High school sure has changed a lot since our day! We were in culture shock at what passes for the new norms of dress and style – talk about peer pressure!

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Adolescence, Brain Injury, and Sexuality

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The transition from childhood to adolescence is fraught with many physical and emotional changes. It can be a difficult time for the child and parents alike. Most families experience a period of major adjustment to the child’s changing mannerisms, quest for privacy and greater independence. When a child experiences a brain injury, either at a younger age or during this period of transition, it commonly creates many more problems than a child arriving at this age without a brain injury.

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Becoming my Husband’s Caregiver after his Brain Injury

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A wife describes the mixed emotions of becoming her husband’s caregiver after his traumatic brain injury changed their lives and their family. As Irene Young entered the new world of caregiving, she became responsible for managing his care, providing emotional support, measuring progress in slow steps, and maintaining hope for recovery. As the parent of a young daughter and the spouse of a survivor of brain injury, she learned the importance of changing expectations, setting goals, finding time, and finding a balance.

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Positive View of Traumatic Brain Injury

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A traumatic brain injury changed the life of Terry Morgan. He went from feeling like a million dollars as pastor of a large church and leading a full active life and career to feeling worthless. The fall that resulted in his brain injury changed his entire life – and that of his family. But as a brain injury survivor, it also resulted in his reevaluating what’s important in life. He now see there is a positive side to brain injury once you survive the physical and emotional trauma and rebuild your life.

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How does TBI affect Children and Adolescents? by Marilyn Lash, M.S.W. and Ron Savage, Ed.D.

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Does a brain injury affect children differently than adults? Yes, unlike the adult, a child’s brain is still developing right up through adolescence. An injury to the brain interrupts this development. A traumatic brain injury is different than a birth disorder or chronic illness. The age when the child is injured affects recovery as the brain matures. Special education services can help students with TBI learn and progress in school.

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Blast Injuries and Concussions in Veterans

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Blasts and explosions are major causes of brain injuries in soldiers injured in Iraq and Afghanistan. Concussion or mild brain injury is often not diagnosed since there is no loss of consciousness and soldiers return to duty. Post traumatic stress disorders (PTSD) have been diagnosed among soldiers and veterans exposed to combat stress who have returned home.

The severity of a brain injury ranges from very minor concussion to extremely severe brain trauma. Service members are exposed to additional damage from the blast’s impact. They can be thrown or propelled by the blast, be burned and inhale toxic substances.

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Families of Veterans with Mild Brain Injury

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Service members and veterans with undiagnosed brain injuries can have difficulty adjusting to family life after returning home. Repeated exposure to blasts increases the likelihood of concussion. Screening soldiers and veterans for concussion or mild brain injury after exposure to blasts and after coming home helps identify symptoms. Early treatment can help veterans cope with symptoms and assist recovery. Equally important is educating family members about mild brain injury.

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Traumatic Brain Injury Rehabilitation

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John Richards never expected to be a brain injury survivor. As a rehabilitation professional, president of a brain injury residential program, and Board of Directors member of the Brain Injury Association of New Hampshire, he was a well known service provider and advocate for persons with acquired brain injuries. The day he was found unconscious next to his bicycle on the road changed all that.

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TBI in Marriage

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Married just nine months, her husband’s brain injury left Barbara Stahura feeling shocked, fearful and anxious about his survival and their future. Watching him in coma she questioned whether he would survive. Once medically stable, there were new concerns once he spoke as the severity of his brain injury became apparent.

She wanted to look inside Ken’s brain, to see what the scanning machines could not, to find his lost self. Would Ken’s brain heal? How much? When? No one could provide the answers. There was nothing to do but move through the days.

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