Category Description:

badge2Living with brain injury, whether it is caused by a traumatic injury, stroke, tumor, infection, or illness, is a lifelong journey for survivors, families, and caregivers. The Brain Injury Blog is about more than the care, treatment and rehabilitation of those who survive brain injury. It is about the journey of brain injury from the perspectives of those who live with it as well as those who provide care, treatment and support. Survival is just the first step in living with brain injury. Please join us in the journey of hope after brain injury.

Special Dog Helps with Brain Injury and Disability

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What is a dog story doing in the Brain Injury Blog? Canine companions or dogs with special training to assist people with disabilities aren’t just for people who are blind.
Grace Peay tells the story of how her special dog, Ackerman, helped her regain her independence after her traumatic brain injury. Struggling with social isolation and depression in addition to her physical challenges after her brain injury, acquiring a canine companion required a lengthy application and training process.

The result is a loving companion, guide and assistant who helps her with the daily challenges of living with a brain injury. Ackerman is an amazing canine companion who has enriched her life.

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Marriage after Brain Injury? It’s not easy

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“Who has those perfect relationships before a brain injury?” That’s the question of Beverly Bryant as she reflect on how her marriage with her husband and relationships with her children changed after her traumatic brain injury.

Moving on means grieving losses and letting go of one’s life prior to the brain injury. Recovery means allowing the survivor to take risks, make mistakes, and regain control while still giving help and support. Finding and maintaining relationships after brain injury is hard. But let’s be truthful. Building meaningful relationships is always hard.

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Normalcy after Brain Injury

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There was nothing mild about the effects of Diana Lund’s brain injury on her life. While she looked normal to others, her difficulty with memory, organization and problem solving meant she struggled to get through each day. Work became impossible. When the damage from a traumatic brain injury is not a visible disability, it is hard for friends, family and coworkers to recognize the cognitive losses.

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Colors for My Brain after My Brain Injury

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After the aneurysms ruptured in her brain, Mary Margaret Yeaton went home to new terrors as she forgot how to do the basic activities of getting through the day. After her brain injury simple tasks like showering, making a cup of coffee and taking medications seemed impossibly difficult. With a friend’s help she found using a color coding system gave her the cues and compensatory strategies she needed to help her memory and organization.

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My Not-So-Mild “Mild” Brain Injury

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Anne Forrest’s account of her diagnosis, treatment and recovery from a so called mild brain injury shows how her life was completely changed by the trauma to her brain in a minor car accident. The cognitive changes resulted not only in the loss of her career, but made it difficult for her to simply get through the day. Looking “normal” made it hard for others to recognize her disability and needs for compensatory strategies and accommodations.

She says, “Looking back, I can see that I was exhausting myself trying to return to work and my normal life. My brain thought I was the old me, and I did not know I could not succeed at my old life with my now-injured brain.”

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Stuff That Clutters Needs to be Stripped after Brain Injury by Kimberly Carnevale

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A traumatic brain injury forces Kimberly Carnevale to reevaluate what’s important in life as a survivor. Coping with the trauma of her brain injury, grieving her losses, losing her home – losing everything leads her to a new beginning as she rebuilds her life. Her daughter and her service dog become the priorities in her life as she clears her mind, builds a new path, and creates a new vision for living a full life as a survivor.

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Blast Injury PTSD in Reservists and National Guard by Marilyn Lash, M.S.W.

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Reservists and National Guard have long deployments in Iraq and Afghanistan which are stressful for families and children. War changes soldiers. Many veterans come home with blast injuries, undiagnosed concussions, post traumatic stress disorders (PTSD), burns and amputated limbs. Adjusting to civilian life, going to college, returning to work, and living with family can be stressful for veterans and family members.

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