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badge2Living with brain injury, whether it is caused by a traumatic injury, stroke, tumor, infection, or illness, is a lifelong journey for survivors, families, and caregivers. The Brain Injury Blog is about more than the care, treatment and rehabilitation of those who survive brain injury. It is about the journey of brain injury from the perspectives of those who live with it as well as those who provide care, treatment and support. Survival is just the first step in living with brain injury. Please join us in the journey of hope after brain injury.

Holiday Stress and Brain Injury by Donna O’Donnell Figurski

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Holidays can be joyful and stressful for everyone, but holiday stress can affect brain injury survivors in many ways. Expectations of families, spending for gifts, parties and crowds, can feel overwhelming and increase anxiety. The consistency and structure that is so important for coping after brain injury can be lost in the holiday madness. Donna O’Donnell Figurski gives tips and strategies for coping with holiday stress after TBI.

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When All Seems Hopeless to a Brain Injury Survivor! by William C. Jarvis, Ed.D.

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Contrary to personal feelings, it is when all seems hopeless that the Brain Injury Survivor needs to go forward in life. Bill Jarvis has struggled with hope and losing hope and knows the trials and heartache of loss and the long journey of recovery.

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A Typical Day with a Brain Injury! (humor) by William C. Jarvis, Ed. D.

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Bill Jarvis shows how a “simple” trip to the store can turn into a confusing maze of detours and surprises when living with a brain injury. He has found that while brain injury isn’t funny, humor helps you cope – and that’s the title of his new book.

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Most Basic Virtue after a TBI is Cognition by William Jarvis, EdD

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What is the most important thing to the TBI Survivor for improvement? Some would think perseverance and some would think consistency. Both are important, but there may be an even more influential virtue.

I suggest that the most influential virtue is “thought.” It is not what a person thinks, but that there is the ability to think in the first place.

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Learn From Your Failures after Brain Injury by William C. Jarvis, Ed. D.

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Failure is not the end but the beginning of the journey for survivors of brain injury or TBI. Bill Jarvis explores how learning from failure brings you closer to success. It is the process of learning from mistakes that helps you go forward.

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What I Learned From a Bathtub by Ann Zuccardy

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Ann Zuccardy relates how even a mild brain injury from a simple household accident can change the nature of how one deals with day to day events.

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Heartfelt Support for Family Caregivers by Barbara Stahura, CJF

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Family caregivers face multiple emotional and physical demands. This article shares the experiences of two families who faced these challenges from the TBI suffered by their veteran spouse. Hearts of Valor is one organization providing support for family caregivers dealing with the effects of TBI and PTSD in wounded veterans.

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Life of a Person with a Brain Injury by William C. Jarvis, Ed.D.

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William Jarvis has lived as a person with a brain injury for many years. While he admits that he is different and that his injury is permanent, and that there are no easy answers, he still hopes on to hope and compassion. He explores the contradictions of of so many survivors who appear “normal” while still balancing the cognitive and physical challenges that can persist over years and even a lifetime.

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HBOT: A Way to Heal the Injured Brain? by Barbara Stahura

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HBOT is used to treat brain injury from trauma or another cause such as stroke. While the number of people who have used HBOT for brain injury is unknown, its popularity is growing. When a trauma occurs, the brain often swells, so the injured tissue does not receive enough oxygen. The area that needs the most oxygen gets the least. HBOT drives oxygen into the cerebrospinal fluid, which carries it to the brain and permits healing.

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Why Are So Many Veterans Homeless? by Shad Meshad

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The VA estimates more than 300,000 veterans are homeless on any given night. Shad Meshad explores why “homelessness is the last stop on this PTSD/TBI train ride, not the first.” Since the symptoms of PTSD and TBI are similar and often overlap, PTSD can be the initial incorrect or incomplete diagnosis where TBI is present. Both these conditions can manifest as depression, anxiety, sleeplessness, irritability, aggression, and increasing social isolation. But TBI can also include memory loss, migraines, seizures, problems with language, and trouble making what might seem like simple decisions. Vets with brain injury need different treatment.

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