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badge2Living with brain injury, whether it is caused by a traumatic injury, stroke, tumor, infection, or illness, is a lifelong journey for survivors, families, and caregivers. The Brain Injury Blog is about more than the care, treatment and rehabilitation of those who survive brain injury. It is about the journey of brain injury from the perspectives of those who live with it as well as those who provide care, treatment and support. Survival is just the first step in living with brain injury. Please join us in the journey of hope after brain injury.

Hobby Night for TBI Survivor Support by William C. Jarvis, Ed.D.

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William Jarvis shows how having a hobby night at a TBI Survivor Support Group can help build confidence, cognition and language expression. As a long-time survivor of a truamatic brain injury, Bill Jarvis has found innovative methods and practices to continue his cognitive rehabilitation and retraining over the years.

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Take the Danger Out of TBI Caregiver Anger by Janet Cromer

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The anger of the TBI caregiver is too often ignored by family, friends and even professionals. While clinicians focus on helping the person with a brain injury whose ability to control anger has been affected, who helps the TBI caregiver whose anger is often not even acknowledged. Janet Cromer explores why it is important to recognize that this anger is real and gives strategies for TBI caregivers to manage that anger. By recognizing what trigger TBI caregiver anger, she helps caregivers respond with positive strategies.

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When TBI Improvement is Hard to See! by William C. Jarvis, Ed.D.

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William (Bill) Jarvis) explores how TBI improvement is a life long process requiring goals, focus and accountability by survivors of brain injury. After the initial rapid gains of medical treatment and rehabilitation, many survivors find it hard to monitor the more subtle and gradual signs of TBI improvement. His experience and approach is testimony to the value of persi

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TBI Loss and Your Personal Power by Jeff Sebell

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Jeff Sebell explores how and why a brain injury or TBI can result in loss of personal power for survivors. When your brain isn’t functioning as it used to after an injury, the changes in a survivor’s life can feel like you’ve lost the power to live your life the way you want to and to be the person you want to be.
TBI causes this loss of personal power by filling the survivor with confusion, indecision, forgetfulness and passivity. He explores how to reclaim your personal power by focusing on how you perceive the world and using the power of your mind.

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Never Give Up Hope after Brain Injury by Jessica Smith

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Jessica Smith is a TBI survivor who managed to hold on to hope after brain injury, even when she could not speak, walk or care for herself. She describes how she fought back and fostered the flicker of hope even when the future seemed unbearable. Describing the love and support of her mom, she credits her presence throughout the ordeal with helping her fight back and regain her life. Her essay is a frank exploration of the pain of loss and the importance of hope even when things look darkest.

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Obsidian by Katie Gielas – Emotional Trauma of a Teen with TBI

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Katie Gielas sustained a traumatic brain injury TBI in adolescence. She reveals her emotional trauma as she fell into a pit of grief and despair revealed by her poignant poem Obsidian. Her writing reveals the struggles and losses she has experienced with not only the loss of her friends, but the loss of her self.

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What Do You Expect of Your Family after Brain Injury? by Rosemary Rawlins

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Rosemary Rawlins recalls that everything that was “normal” about her family and the routine of their daily life was so taken for granted and then it was shaken to the core after her husband’s brain injury. How do you face the uncertainty of the future and how do you make a new life plan when it is unclear what the meaning of “recovery” will be?

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My New Normal After Concussion by Madelyn Uretsky

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After a severe concussion playing in her high school soccer game, Madeline Uretsky found herself still suffering from symptoms two years later. It affected every aspect of her life – her studies, friendships, family, and hopes for her future. She has learned to live with this “new normal” but often cannot do things that normal teenagers do, like going to the mall, movies, concerts, sporting events, stores, restaurants, or crowded places. Her experience has led her to educating students and athletes about concussion and advocacy for greater awareness.

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Don’t be discouraged, there is always another bus for a TBI survivor! by William C. Jarvis, Ed.D.

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William Jarvis contrasts the wish of so many TBI survivors for immediate healing with the challenges of living with a brain injury over years and even a lifetime. Struggles for the TBI Survivor can seem endless. It is acquiring the internal strength of patience that can make living with this injury possible. Your mental attitude towards difficulties can make the difference. By learning from failures, becoming persistent, and having patience, life can be meaningful and rewarding.

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Hope after Brain Injury – Never say Never by Jessica Smith

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Brain injury hope – what’s that mean? I’m Jessy. I would like to start off by saying that if anyone has any doubt about if your loved one or even yourself could possibility recover from a brain injury, I’m ecstatic to tell you there’s always a possibility of recovering if you have hope. Without hope, there’s really no recovery. You have to remember that the doctors that you or your loved ones see are smart, but they definitely don’t know everything. You know your limits better than a doctor does and it always helps having support.

I know from experience that a brain injury changes some aspects of your life, but by no means does it define you. I know because I have a TBI (traumatic brain injury).

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