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badge2Living with brain injury, whether it is caused by a traumatic injury, stroke, tumor, infection, or illness, is a lifelong journey for survivors, families, and caregivers. The Brain Injury Blog is about more than the care, treatment and rehabilitation of those who survive brain injury. It is about the journey of brain injury from the perspectives of those who live with it as well as those who provide care, treatment and support. Survival is just the first step in living with brain injury. Please join us in the journey of hope after brain injury.

Invisibility and Disability of Brain Injury by Cheryl Green

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You know how people sometimes refer to traumatic brain injury as a silent epidemic? And you could say disabilities from brain injury are invisible. No one can actually see your brain in action in everyday life. For those of us living with effects from brain injury in ourselves or someone close, we know it’s not so invisible or silent. Spend one day in my house, and you’ll observe me working from three calendars that don’t match and going up and down the stairs trying to figure out what I was looking for (a nap). It’s pretty visible. But sure, I try to hide some things in public because I’m people make fun of me and my newer quirks.

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Life goes on after TBI – Fourteen Years Later by William C. Jarvis, Ed.D.

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Living with brain injury or TBI is a long journey. Bill Jarvis shares the problems he has faced and his progress over 14 years since his injury. He encourages survivors to persevere and keep moving forward – no matter what physical, psychological, or cognitive challenges you face. While there are still things he can not do, his life has still better because he did not give up. He reminds you that giving up is an option but going on with life is a better choice.

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Are We Asking Too Much of Families? by Marilyn Lash, MSW

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Rosemary Rawlins’ book Learning by Accident is a very personal account of her husband Hugh’s brain injury that is unlike any other book I have read. What is so very special is how she brings the reader into her home as a wife and mother who is thrust into the world of caregiving. Unfortunately, her experience is not unique. What is unique is how she chronicles her husband’s journey from the brink of death through the long grind of surgeries, therapies, and complications into an uncertain future for their marriage, their children, his employment, and their future.

This book made me rethink what we ask of families in this world of managed care with shorter hospital stays. We give enormous challenges to families as they become the rehabilitation providers at home – yet too often, we do not give them the support, information or resources they need. This book will make you both admire what family caregivers do and also make you question why we do not help them more.

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What Brain Injury Survivors Want You to Know by Barbara Webster

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Survivors of brain injury are often given advice or direction on what to say – or not to say; how to do something – or not do it; when to do something – or when to stop. The advice can be well meaning and intended to offer help and support. But Barbara Webster flips the table and list the things that brain injury survivors want you to know. This list of brain injury wisdom carries valuable messages for caregivers, families, friends, colleagues and providers. Listen carefully!

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Brain Injury Talk – Why Do People Anger Us By What they Say? by Jeff Sebell

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Is there anyone among us who has had a brain injury who is not sensitive to what other people say about us? It is a fact that we are possessive and emotionally connected to our brain injuries; and with good reason. We are understandably sensitive (some would say, hypersensitive) when others make offhanded comments or broad statements that can cause us to feel defensive, not understood or trivialized.

Although the person making these comments may feel they are just innocent observations, we hear them as assaults on our integrity, our strength and our motivation.

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Principles of Success in TBI: The 4 Ps by William C. Jarvis, Ed.D.

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Many have successfully improved after their TBI. Often there are common threads to their success. These common threads are the same ones I have used throughout life. Success is defined not in terms of 100% healing, but in terms of inner peace in your accomplishments. I have used these principles in my professional career and more recently in my rehabilitation from a debilitating car collision in 2000. The principles to my success have been perseverance, productivity, purpose, and prayer.

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Relationships after TBI and how to improve them! by William C. Jarvis, Ed.D.

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Adjusting to your new life and interacting with people is a common problem following a brain injury. There are reasons why relationships after TBI are so difficult. The first obvious outcome always results in the Survivor not being the same after the injury. Friends and family expect the same person in personality, temperament, and general reaction to events of everyday living.

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National People With Brain Injury Acceptance and Appreciation Month by Cheryl Green

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This year, I got to present at some events for national Brain Injury Awareness Month. I ran around calling them National People With Brain Injury Acceptance and Appreciation Month events! We need these events to focus and share crucial information about injuries, the impact they have on people, and new diagnosis and treatment protocols. But to me, when the emphasis on brain injury overshadows discussion of the people who actually have the brain injury, I get a little nervous!

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My Life after Being Hit by a Semi; The Story of My Brain Injury by William Boggs

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Can someone live after being hit by an 18-wheeler truck? This is my story. My story is about an experience that not many people face. Those people who do face what I experienced may not be as blessed as I was. I can truly say that God has His hand on my life. No one saw it coming and no one was prepared. Not only was I in an accident that affected me physically, but the very core of my spiritual life was turned upside down.

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Relationship: Where is the Love? by Matthew and Cassondra Brown

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Matthew and Cossandra Brown talk openly about how the effects of his TBI and PTSD changed their relationship and almost destroyed their marriage. His anger, drinking, and sexual demands drove his wife away and they separated. Even his young children were scared by his anger and outbursts.Losing contol over his life and with his marriage dissolving, he sought counseling and help for his PTSD. Cossondra reveals what it was like for her as a spouse and her concerns for her children during this tumultuous time. Now reunited, they are rebuilding their marriage and future. .

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