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Survivors of acquired and traumatic brain injury share challenges and rewards of rebuilding their lives and futures. Learning how to live with a brain injury can be a long, stressful and slow process that involves rebuilding your life and reshaping your future. These blog articles by survivors share the challenges, frustrations, joys and rewards of finding hope and a new way of living. By moving forward toward what is possible rather than looking back at what has been lost, it is possible to bring meaning to your life.

Brain Injury Survivor Travels the World

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Survivor, brain injury expert, author, educator, and award winner – Christine Durham is all of these. Traveling from her home in Australia to the US and Canada, she finds the brain injury community shares many hopes and dreams – as well as frustrations. Her international perspective is both personal and entertaining as you read her travel journal.

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Brain Injury and Traveling Alone by Amanda Nachman

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Flying with ease is something I have taken for granted my entire adult life, up until my accident in January, 2011 when I suffered a mild traumatic brain injury. Traveling alone was a challenge I hadn’t thought of until I tried it this past week for the first time. I flew from Minneapolis, Minnesota to Oakland, California with a layover in Denver, Colorado. I thought it would be a piece of cake, but I was wrong.

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Embracing Your New Self after Brain Injury

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Amanda Nachman was an elementary schoolteacher for fifteen years prior to her mild traumatic brain injury in 2011. She is still working on her recovery, and writing to share her story to get the word out that not only athletes and soldiers are dealing with this invisible disability, but people we come across every day can be affected by the impact concussions can have on us. She is hoping she can help change the way the medical field responds to others who find themselves in a similar situation.

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Four Ways To Improve Your Brain and Your Life

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For the past 18 years, I’ve experienced vertigo, which is extreme dizziness. While vertigo could come in different forms, such as from an inner ear inbalance, my vertigo comes from brain damage. When I have vertigo, my whole world stops, though my head is spinning, and I’ve learned ways to keep it at a minimum for several years. How do I help control my vertigo and improve my brain? How could you do this, too?

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Even Teachers Get Concussions by Amanda Nachman

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Amanda Nachman was an elementary schoolteacher for fifteen years prior to her mild traumatic brain injury in 2011. She is still working on her recovery, and writing to share her story to get the word out that not only athletes and soldiers are dealing with this invisible disability, but people we come across every day can be affected by the impact concussions can have on us. She is hoping she can help change the way the medical field responds to others who find themselves in a similar situation.

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Two Years…After Brain Injury by David Grand

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In a few days, I mark yet another milestone. It was on November 11, 2010 that I was struck while cycling. Two years ago, I was living the last few days of my pre-brain injury life, never knowing what the hand of fate was about to deal me. For many years, my dad has said that if he had the chance to look into a crystal ball to view the future, he would most likely pass. When I was a younger man, I simply could not understand his perspective.

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Understanding When Family and Friends Don’t Know How To Act

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We were sitting around on the deck the day after the wedding and at one point I was having trouble following the conversation. My brother stopped and said “OK everyone dial their intellect down a notch so Terri can follow” That was supposed to be funny. My reaction was wow – that hurt. I realized that it was his way of dealing with my occasional processing issues. It makes him uncomfortable and he does not know how to handle it.

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Computer Usage and Traumatic Brain Injury?

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Research has determined that the use of a computer helps brain stimulation. The playing of computer games significantly improved a young boy’s concentration that was diagnosed with attention deficit disorder. A software program has been successfully used in a touch screen format to exercise the mind of an 81-year-old resident of Belmont Village Senior Living in Sabre Springs, a suburb of San Diego.

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Get a Group, Get a Life after Brain Injury

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But like any other human being since the dawn of time, hardship has reared its head repeatedly. From the unexpected loss of family members to a bankrupt business, some heavy blows have fallen. This does not make me unique. It simply makes me human. I carry no hard feelings or resentment about any of my challenges or difficult experiences. In fact, at a deeper level, I can appreciate them as they strengthen me. As steel is tempered and made stronger by fire, so have the fires of my own life, including my brain injury, made me stronger.

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No Two Paths are Alike by David Grant

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My Fate has lead me down a path where I do have a very unique insight into the realm of brain injury that only comes from living it. If you add together every bit of knowledge I’ve gleaned from the books I read, the websites I’ve poured through, the doctors I’ve talked to, the summation of all of that “outside information” is only a speck of dust compared to what I’ve learned firsthand by actually living daily with a brain injury.

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