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Survivors of acquired and traumatic brain injury share challenges and rewards of rebuilding their lives and futures. Learning how to live with a brain injury can be a long, stressful and slow process that involves rebuilding your life and reshaping your future. These blog articles by survivors share the challenges, frustrations, joys and rewards of finding hope and a new way of living. By moving forward toward what is possible rather than looking back at what has been lost, it is possible to bring meaning to your life.

Four Ways to Insure TBI Improvement!

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Improvement after a severe TBI after you go home is always difficult. This is because of the injury and usually the lack of ideas as to what to do. When in the hospital you have the expertise of therapists and medical personnel. When you go home, you often lack the clear thinking or experience to know what to do.

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Measurement for Brain Injury

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The measurement of physical improvement after an injury resulting from a Traumatic Brain Injury is initially the medical indications of brain activity through signs of physiological activity. This may be even during the time a person is in a coma.

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Begin Again Ranch

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Hello fellow brain injury survivors. My name is Terri Mongait and I, too, am a TBI survivor. Months after my accident in September, 2009 I was able to complete my studies and received my certification in Equine Gestalt Coaching. I am now a Brain Injury Recovery Coach at Begin Again Ranch in Sedalia, Colorado.

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Passion is Necessary to Make a Difference!

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During an interview of Phil Mickelson the well know golfer today on TV, he indicated he was involved in training teachers in math and science. He went on to say that training teachers is where you can make a difference. Most elementary teachers are not even certified to teach in these areas and lack the knowledge and passion to teach other than following the textbook. Therefore, most lack the love and enthusiasm for the subject. He emphasized “passion” while instructing. A person attains passion through an in depth understanding of the area he/she is attempting to involve the other person.

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Helping Families and Survivors Cope with Life after Brain Injury

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Coping with life after brain injury is challenging for both families and survivors. It’s easy to give lip service to the importance of educating and supporting families. But how do you do it when rehabilitation stays are shorter, insurance coverage is limited, and families are already stressed to the max? Samantha Backhaus has developed a 16 week curriculum for adults with brain injury and their families that is designed to help them not only learn about brain injury and brain trauma but to help them develop the skills needed to cope, problem solve and manage life at home.

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Never, never, ever give up hope

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It’s over six months since my last blog, and I’ve been a bit busy completing my PhD – which is now with the examiners. Phew! It’s been a battle with my constant brain injury shadows – the Brain Dragon that scorches holes in my memory, and doubles my vision and the Pain Monster isn’t much fun either! But it’s done and I’ve written three new chapters for the reprinting of my book ‘Doing Up Buttons’ and at last I can take a breath and spend a few minutes with you.

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Words of Wisdom

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Robert Hensel has lived with a disability since birth but it does not define him. The power of his abilities rather than the losses from his disability are what define him. A poet and activist, his selected quotations on living life fully reflect lessons learned. They are also lessons that he shares with others who face challenges, whether from an illness, brain trauma or physical injury. On those days when it just seems too hard, just take a moment and read his blog. We hope you will take the time to comment on his reflections.

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Sense of Self after Brain Injury

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Not only did your life change after your brain injury, but your sense of self changes as well. What is this “sense of self” that everyone is talking about? It is that knowledge of what kind of person you are, how you feel and act, how you have developed over time, the roles you fill and the roles you play. Rather than seeing this change solely as a loss, your changing sense of self after a brain injury is an opportunity to design yourself all over again.

One thing that contributes to a positive sense of self is a sense of accomplishment. Whether it’s learning to tie your shoes again or to learn a new language after your brain injury, it’s a lot of work but you will get better at it over time – and that is an accomplishment!

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Understanding Your Anger after Traumatic Brain Injury

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Family and caregivers often complain of a survivor’s anger after a traumatic brain injury. They say the person is hard to get along with and that affects their relationships. Mike Strand gives his view as a person with a brain injury that anger is about more than emotions and brain trauma. It’s also about communication and cognition. He talks about how he reacts when others accuse him of being angry and describes both his thought process and emotional reactions. This blog gives insights into what’s behind the behavior that is so easily termed “anger’ by caregivers and family members.

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Improving after Brain Injury

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A plan for improvement is a must. All improvement programs that are effective start with a plan. If there is no plan, there is no direction on how to proceed. A person with a TBI often lacks the thought process to think through this first step. Therefore, no plan results in minimal progress. While at the hospital, a therapist has a plan and knowledge as what to do for you in these early stages of your recovery.

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