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Survivors of acquired and traumatic brain injury share challenges and rewards of rebuilding their lives and futures. Learning how to live with a brain injury can be a long, stressful and slow process that involves rebuilding your life and reshaping your future. These blog articles by survivors share the challenges, frustrations, joys and rewards of finding hope and a new way of living. By moving forward toward what is possible rather than looking back at what has been lost, it is possible to bring meaning to your life.

Real-Life Superheroes Do Exist (I’ve Seen Them)! by Kim Thompson

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You don’t have to be superman or superwoman to have special talents or powers. Kim Thompson’s brain injury blog explores what we expect from our superheroes and suggests that survivors of TBI are the most powerful heroes just by facing each new day.

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Holiday Stress and Brain Injury by Donna O’Donnell Figurski

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Holidays can be joyful and stressful for everyone, but holiday stress can affect brain injury survivors in many ways. Expectations of families, spending for gifts, parties and crowds, can feel overwhelming and increase anxiety. The consistency and structure that is so important for coping after brain injury can be lost in the holiday madness. Donna O’Donnell Figurski gives tips and strategies for coping with holiday stress after TBI.

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When All Seems Hopeless to a Brain Injury Survivor! by William C. Jarvis, Ed.D.

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Contrary to personal feelings, it is when all seems hopeless that the Brain Injury Survivor needs to go forward in life. Bill Jarvis has struggled with hope and losing hope and knows the trials and heartache of loss and the long journey of recovery.

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A Typical Day with a Brain Injury! (humor) by William C. Jarvis, Ed. D.

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Bill Jarvis shows how a “simple” trip to the store can turn into a confusing maze of detours and surprises when living with a brain injury. He has found that while brain injury isn’t funny, humor helps you cope – and that’s the title of his new book.

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Most Basic Virtue after a TBI is Cognition by William Jarvis, EdD

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What is the most important thing to the TBI Survivor for improvement? Some would think perseverance and some would think consistency. Both are important, but there may be an even more influential virtue.

I suggest that the most influential virtue is “thought.” It is not what a person thinks, but that there is the ability to think in the first place.

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Learn From Your Failures after Brain Injury by William C. Jarvis, Ed. D.

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Failure is not the end but the beginning of the journey for survivors of brain injury or TBI. Bill Jarvis explores how learning from failure brings you closer to success. It is the process of learning from mistakes that helps you go forward.

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What I Learned From a Bathtub by Ann Zuccardy

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Ann Zuccardy relates how even a mild brain injury from a simple household accident can change the nature of how one deals with day to day events.

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Life of a Person with a Brain Injury by William C. Jarvis, Ed.D.

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William Jarvis has lived as a person with a brain injury for many years. While he admits that he is different and that his injury is permanent, and that there are no easy answers, he still hopes on to hope and compassion. He explores the contradictions of of so many survivors who appear “normal” while still balancing the cognitive and physical challenges that can persist over years and even a lifetime.

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Old Experiences Help Cognitive Improvement after Brain Injury by William C. Jarvis, EdD

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When William jarvis sustained a serious brain injury, he was uncertain whether he could return to his position as a college professor, a job requiring complex cognitive skills, He reflects on how he used his past academic and artistic experiences, as well as prior learning, to build his cognitive improvement. Now retired, he admits that though his difficulties never go away, he has been able to achieve success in other aspects of life. His message to other survivors of brain injury is to never give up trying.

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I Found my Brain on the Radio by Kim Jefferson Justus

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Now an advocate for brain injury survivors after her misdiagnosis when she had an aneurysm, Kim Justus is now an author and radio host featuring interviews with survivors, families, caregivers, and clinicians. She interviews survivors and provides educational information on “life after brain injury” and issues related to caregiving. She discusses the problems she and other survivors face as well as the solutions they have found.

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