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Survivors of acquired and traumatic brain injury share challenges and rewards of rebuilding their lives and futures. Learning how to live with a brain injury can be a long, stressful and slow process that involves rebuilding your life and reshaping your future. These blog articles by survivors share the challenges, frustrations, joys and rewards of finding hope and a new way of living. By moving forward toward what is possible rather than looking back at what has been lost, it is possible to bring meaning to your life.

Cooking with Brain Injury by Cheryl Green and William Alton

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This short film by Cheryl Green infuses humor into daily struggles of life after traumatic brain injury. Cooking with Brain Injury shows how the ordinary task of cooking can become a challenging puzzle for the survivor of a brain injury. True events are shown in style of a network TV cooking show where the cooks are stymied by a piece of salmon and their own unpredictable obstacles.

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My Concussion Changed Me By Catz LeBlanc

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Catz LeBlanc describes the impact of a concussion she sustained as a sports injury that was soon after compounded by a car crash leaving her unable to work or function from day to day. Suddenly she was not the competent independent woman she knew but found herself struggling to understand what had happened to her. Losing her friends and family and her job was tough enough, but losing her ability to think clearly and negotiate the cognitive challenges of daily life was devastating. Her reflections and insights about what it means to have a brain injury and the misperceptions of others about “what was wrong with me” have led her to asking many new questions.

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The Slow Crawl of Brain Injury Recovery by David Grant

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David Grant describes his journey of brain injury recovery to find a “new normal” after he was broadsided while cycling in 2010. Entering the uncharted territory of specialists and hospitals, his cognitive challenges continued over time and increased his stress and anxiety. New difficulties with speech and memory undermined his sense of self and ability to work, jeopardizing his future. His insights into life as a survivor of a brain injury bring new insights and meaning to his life now.

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Becoming the Healer: The Miracle of Brain Injury by Deborah Schlag

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Becoming-The-Healer.jpgBecoming the Healer: The Miracle of Brain Injury is a book to be read by everyone, not just for understanding the brain injured person. No matter where you are in your life, reading or listening to this story will renew in you hope, faith, and the belief that miracles still happen today and can happen for you too. You will be inspired with great ideas, encouraging you to step out in faith, to let go of your fears, and to make the necessary changes to step into your own miracles.

This was the case with Deborah Schlag who never imagined herself to be given the gift of healing. Now, having experienced a brain injury and the miracles of healing that have brought her full circle in that process she shares to help you do the same.

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Surviving Separation and Divorce after TBI by William C. Jarvis, Ed.D.

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A traumatic brain injury can result in so many losses with the physical, social, emotional, behavioral, and financial changes. TBI survivor, Bill Jarvis, shares how his relationship with his wife changed as she became his caregiver. The toll eventually led to their separation and divorce plunging him into despair and grief. Sustained by his faith, he has rebuilt his life and found new meaning. He shares what he has learned with tips for survivors on how to head off a divorce.

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Brain and Healing by William Jarvis

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ALL TBI SURVIVORS AND CARE GIVERS NEED TO KNOW that improvement is possible, even years later. It always amazes me the amount of healing that can take place in the brain. The brain is always trying to do things in parts that have been injured and even sometimes other parts of the brain take over. This does not mean 100% healing, but it does mean you can be better tomorrow than you are today!!!

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Magic as Therapy after Brain Injury

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Being disabled is not fun! A car collision for me in 2000 resulted in a coma, fractured C1-C4 vertebrae, a Traumatic Brain Injury, and one and a half years in hospitals. During this time, magic has helped me greatly in rehabilitation. I have spent years in recovery and still continue to benefit from performing magic. Years of teaching in public schools and working as an Education Professor at Taylor University Fort Wayne gave me a background in how to motivate children. My experience in magic and a Merlin Magician in the IBM provided a unique tool for rehabilitation improvement.

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Head Injury: Where the Rubber Meets the Road by Ron Harnett

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My wheelbarrow tire suddenly goes flat. With the spring thaw, dirt and debris to be loaded on and carted around, not good timing.

What to do? What turns out is a classic TBI exchange. Mike, a fellow TBIer—he a car crash back in ‘96, me a fall off the iron in ’73—will come to the rescue. Mike repairs, fixes and changes tires on cars and trucks—and now a wheelbarrow—that pull up to a single-stall garage attached to a busy truck stop, Crystal Café.

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Hi God, it’s me, David – After My Brain Injury! by David Grant

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Since my accident, I’ve taken up an interest in nuclear physics. That alone is a bit of an oddity. Most of your Kids don’t realize that all the matter that we see, all that we touch, all that defines the word as we see it, all that matter comes from exploding stars. Every atom and molecule that makes me is a piece of stardust. Virtually every human being who has walked the Earth since time began is made of stardust. It’s a bit humbling.

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The Near Normal after Brain Injury

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Four years ago, I survived two Mild Traumatic Brain Injuries, one from a car accident in which I was broadsided while idling at a stoplight. My driver’s side and curtain airbags deployed. Contre Coup. Less than a week later, I slipped and fell on the sidewalk at work; ice disguised beneath the snow, and hit the back of my head. I coined the term, “the near normal,” instead of “the new normal,” in relationship to the way in which I function today, four years later.

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