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Survivors of acquired and traumatic brain injury share challenges and rewards of rebuilding their lives and futures. Learning how to live with a brain injury can be a long, stressful and slow process that involves rebuilding your life and reshaping your future. These blog articles by survivors share the challenges, frustrations, joys and rewards of finding hope and a new way of living. By moving forward toward what is possible rather than looking back at what has been lost, it is possible to bring meaning to your life.

Brain Injury Pancakes

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When I do something well that used to be really hard, I am so proud. But if I get too proud, I call it “being sassy.” That’s when my logic has gone out the window. For example, if I finally finish a Sudoku, I might then decide I have no more brain injury impairments, and I will go for a run. I’m dizzy within a few blocks, and then a loud truck goes by and frightens me. I turn around and come home, head held low. Oh yeah, I think to myself. Sudoku is Sudoku. Jogging in a noisy, busy place is something very different.

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Why Mince Words? PTSD Sucks.

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Just like there are a myriad of flavors of ice cream, so it is with Post traumatic Stress Disorder. No two cases are alike. Unlike so many, I can bike by the exact spot where my soul was bruised in a cacophony of broken glass, twisted metal and wailing rescue vehicles… I can pass that exact spot, and do several times a week, without any real issue. Sure, there are still times I bike up Granite Ave and think to myself, “this is where I experienced the last few minutes of a life I now mostly forget.”

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Being Taken Seriously After a Traumatic Brain Injury

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Up until a couple of weeks ago, I never understood why any doctor, insurance company, or employer, would think my brain injury symptoms weren’t real. Did those workman’s compensation doctor’s really think I was faking them to avoid… earning money, having health insurance, and doing all of the things that I loved. What was it that gave me clarity? Secretary of State, Hillary Clinton.

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“Nobody’s Child” – America’s Child Abuse Victims

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“ Boy, I thought, what a great day this is turning out to be afterall.” The sun is shining, a warm gentle breeze is blowing, Sweeping softly across my face bringing with it the fresh scents of early springtime. I said to myself “ this is a perfect time to stroll through the local Neighborhood Park on my way to the corner market to pick up a few things to snack on during the big game on TV tonight.”

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Journal Writing: A Window into Life by Janelle Breese Biagioni

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It seems to be our nature to see the accomplishments of others; however, we often overlook our own. We either fear what we have done is not enough or we don’t see how all the little things we did actually contributed to a bigger accomplishment.

Journal writing is a great way to record short, simple notes so that from time to time you can read and reflect on your journey. Often, it’s surprising to see how far you have come.

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MTBI & PTSD – Living with a Traumatic Brain Injury by David Grant

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I watched her sleep today. Always the first one up in the morning, my brain often waking up an hour or more before I do, today I had the luxury of not jumping tight out of bed.

And she was smiling in her sleep.

And I was glad… glad that she was able to find a measure of peace away from the daily challenges of life.

We’ve all heard that old saying about a picture being worth a thousand words. But looks can indeed be quite deceiving. A face smiling back at you as you look at a picture tells you so little. Rather than a using picture to tell the tale, today I opt for the Thousand Words.

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Is Brain Injured, Brain Damaged?

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Mike Strand reflects on how words such as brain damaged, brain injured, disabled, or crippled send powerful messages about the value of the individual. Survivor and recovery are also used freely but what do they really mean for the person who is living with a brain injury. As a survivor and a person who has lived with a brain injury since 1989, Mike Strand shares his perspective and personal views on the words that he chooses to use to describe his life.

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Journal after Brain Injury – Tips and topics for journaling

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Whether you’re living with your own brain injury or are a family caregiver, you can benefit from writing your thoughts and feelings for just a few minutes a couple of times a week. It helps to have some good techniques available both to help you start a writing session and to broaden your journaling practice to make it more satisfying and productive. Some of these techniques are the Unsent Letter, Perspectives, Captured Moment, and Dialogue.

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Sharing Improvement with Others after Brain Injury

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Catching a very large fish, winning the lottery, and finding something that was very valuable and lost are all examples of exciting things to share with others. A person that has just experienced a wonderful event is anxious to share his experience with someone else. The process of sharing the information is affirming as to what happened and validates the experience. The same is true when a person shares improvement with others.

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TBI Traveler: To Infinity and Beyond by David Grant

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So much has changed since the day of my accident. I still struggle to live the life I used to live. As more time passes the reality that there is no going back settles even deeper into the very core of my being.

As I put my thoughts on paper today I am at 30,000 feet heading back North to New Hampshire, both Sarah and I are foot weary from a few days walking around Disney World. Though now well into year three of my post-TBI life, I still marvel at my naiveté.

How innocent I feel looking back on last week’s simple request.

“Sarah, can we take a short vacation from all things TBI?” I asked as we packed for our trip. “I just want to forget about it all for a few days.”

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