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badge2Living your life with a brain injury is much more complex than physical survival and medical progress. These blog articles discuss the long term effects of brain injuries on relationships over time.

Psychological Dimension TBI Improvement – Part 4

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The psychological aspect of improvement is probably the greatest influence upon the other three areas. It is assumed there is also a culminating effect of applying cognitive strategies for improvement in other dimensions as well. It is a person’s ability to psychologically know he is improving when progress is so slow that makes the difference.

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The Real Stars of Traumatic Brain Injury

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It’s impossible for me to count the number of times over the past 20 years that I have heard someone say: “We need to find a celebrity to be the spokesperson for brain injury.” I have always opposed this for several reasons.

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A Community with Relationships for Survivors of Brain Injury

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Too many adults who are survivors of brain injury have had multiple losses and lead isolated, lonely lives. Brain injury rehabilitation services have focused too much on trying to “fix” the survivor through rehabilitation treatment rather than helping the survivor develop a community with meaningful relationships that contribute to quality of life. This new direction is based on Condeluci’s concept of social capital and could change how rehabilitation programs and human services are delivered.

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Poem: Look Back, Move Forward

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If hope seems futile and it’s hard To Be

Look back and you will see

How far you’ve come from months gone by

When you were blind and did not know just what to do.

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PTSD and Your Children on the News

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As troops are returning home from deployments in Iraq, a regular feature on the evening news has become reunions with spouses, parents, and children. Because I live inNorth Carolinawhere there are multiple bases, I see this at least once a week – finally, some joy on the evening news in between the latest disaster, political campaign, or financial report. Especially touching are the reunions when a parent – still in camouflage uniforms – appears at school to surprise a child who has not seen mom or dad for many, many months or more than a year. It is impossible not to smile, and I admit to tearing up occasionally, at the incredible joy of this “parent and child reunion” to borrow a phrase from a Paul Simon song.

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Caregivers – Do Something Nice for Yourself this Holiday Season

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Caregiving is extremely taxing. People do it out of love and they want to take care of their loved one, but the strain and toll it takes on the caregiver’s life is real and should not be overlooked. I know we are raised to NOT be selfish, but sometimes that is exactly what we need to do. Carving out some time alone is often the only way to recharge your batteries. And, we know how exhausting the holiday season can be so as a caregiver, you may feel it even more so.

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Budgeting Grief at Christmas after Brain Injury

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We like to think of Christmas as a time that is rich with tradition and filled with joyful festivities. People look forward to spending the holidays with family and friends, exchanging gifts, indulging in delectable treats and reminiscing about the good old days. On the other hand, for many, it brings tremendous pressure to celebrate it in the way we always did or in the same way others do.

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Surround Yourself with Like-Minded People after Brain Injury

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One of the first things I learned as a writer was to surround myself with like-minded people. This meant that I needed to be around people who understood the creative process and who also held a passion to achieve great things with their work.

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Being Accountable after Brain Injury

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We have all been in situations where we did something that was careless or thoughtless and caused distress for others. An example would be bumping into a table and knocking off a treasured ornament, smashing it into a gazillion pieces. We feel foolish and may even say, “Oh my goodness, look what I’ve done. I am so sorry. That was completely my fault. Please let me replace it for you.” Don’t confuse this with self-blame – this is being accountable for one’s action and making amends or rectifying the situation.

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Marriage and Traumatic Brain Injury: Who is the Caregiver Here?

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I guess for Bill and I, the first thing we had to get over when he was injured was the Traumatic part of the equation. I am sure we have all had trauma in our life, so you know that it keeps coming back from time to time. PTSD, is a real problem and many of us suffer from it, both from TBI and our previous life experiences.

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