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badge2Living your life with a brain injury is much more complex than physical survival and medical progress. These blog articles discuss the long term effects of brain injuries on relationships over time.

Being a Group Participant after Brain Injury

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We can experience being part of a group in many ways. These groups may also be called teams, clubs, troops, a crowd or a unit. You may be part of an art group, musical group, theatre group, gardening group, cooking group, reading group, dance group, or a travel group. The list goes on and on. Many individuals living with a brain injury and/or their family members have come to experience, perhaps for the first time, another type of group: Support Group.

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Peer Support after Brain Injury

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Peer Support is essentially individuals supporting other individuals with similar or shared experiences. This support is offered one-to-one or in a group setting. The benefits of peer support are numerous, including that the supporter has credibility and is trusted because they have been through the experience.

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November is National Family Caregiver Month

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Did you know that National Family Caregiver Month (NFC Month) is observed every November? The National Family Caregiver Association (NFCA) originated the observance in 1997 to focus attention on the more than 65 million family caregivers who provide 80% of the long-term care services in the US. Studies show that family caregivers provide over $375 billion in “free caregiving services” just in care for older adults annually.

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Expression Through Art After Brain Injury

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When I suggest people use art as a way to express their feelings, often the response is, “I can’t draw.” Art is so much more than sketching on paper and there are many ways in which it can be experienced. Art is a tiny word for an expansive list of activities: music, writing, film, photography, sculpting, drawing and painting, gardening and more.

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Never, never, never, never ever give up after Brain Injury!

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I finished filling the black-board with fractions and closed my classroom door. I told myself that my students would finish the unit on fractions tomorrow if it killed me. Those fractions nearly did kill me! If I’d written one more, or one less, my future would have been totally different. I would have avoided that car crash that crashed my life.

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Are You a Positive Polly or a Negative Nelly after Brain Injury?

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I know it sounds rather cliché to ask if you look at the world through rose-coloured glasses, but do you? Are you accused of being a Pollyanna? If you answered yes to one or both of these questions I say, “Good for you!” I would rather be hopeful and optimistic any day over being disgruntled and pessimistic. Let’s face it… group #1 is going to have a lot more friends and a lot more fun!!!

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To Counter Burnout, One Must be Rekindled after Brain Injury

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When one sustains a Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), it not only changes his or her life from that point on, but also changes the lives of his or her family members. It is for this reason that it is claimed that when a TBI happens, it happens to the entire family. Family involvement is inevitable after a loved one endures a TBI. The level of family involvement needed however, depends on the severity and nature of the TBI that was obtained by the loved one.

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Lost and Found After Brain Injury

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I have just written a book: Lost & Found: a survivor’s guide for reconstructing life after brain injury; a strategy guide for brain injury survivors. One of the biggest challenges I had writing in this book was keeping up with our ever-evolving increasingly technical world. When I began putting together materials for the brain injury survivor support group I have facilitated for many years, which is how the book began to develop, very few people had computers at home, no one had a cell phone-never mind a “smart phone”, there were no GPS systems for our cars, we used music cassettes – not CD’s or I Pods, and renting a movie from the video store to play at home on your VCR was a treat for the weekend.

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Reconnecting with Joy After Brain Injury

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So many things in life give us joy. From precious babies and newborn animals to music, painting, photography, sculpting, gardening, mountain climbing and cooking, people experience joy. When you suffer a loss, it snuffs the joy out of your life and it makes it difficult to put a smile on your face.

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Twelve Skills for Caregivers and Survivors Aging with Brain Injury

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In earlier posts, I’ve shared skills for family caregivers during the seasons or stages of crisis, hospital homecoming, and the “new normal.” Many people who sustain a brain injury live for many years. At the same time, older people are being diagnosed with brain injuries from falls, accidents, strokes, and other diseases. Aging with brain injury is the subject of much research and interest in the brain injury community now.

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