Category Description:

badge2Living your life with a brain injury is much more complex than physical survival and medical progress. These blog articles discuss the long term effects of brain injuries on relationships over time.

Emotional Mis-communication Changes Relationships after Brain Injury

post thumbnail

Why do many persons with brain injury have trouble developing and maintaining relationships? It may be due to changes in their ability to read and express emotions. This is essential for communicating and connecting with other people and for sustaining close relationships. Research into the expression and interpretation of emotions by survivors is examining new areas for brain injury treatment and recovery.

Read More

Grieving Losses after a Brain Injury

post thumbnail

Grieving is a deep sadness that we try to avoid, it is an anguish in your heart that words really can’t touch or describe. But, I know from experience that grieving is necessary and must be embraced when there has been a loss in your life.

Read More

Cost of Traumatic Brain Injury

post thumbnail

Treatment for traumatic brain injury can be costly for the child or adult who has been injured as well as the family. Hospital care, rehabilitation, therapies, medication, home care, equipment – all can be costly. These expenses are added to lost income of family members. The costs of care for traumatic brain injury, insurance limits, and limited community resources add to the stress of families.

Read More

Physical and Mental Aging after a Brain Injury

post thumbnail

Survivors of traumatic brain injury worry about the effects of aging on cognition, depression, Alzheimer’s disease, and epilepsy. Aging is not a disease, but aging can compound the effects of brain trauma including memory, organization, and problem solving. Ten rules are given to help adults with TBI with the aging process.

Read More

Prison Inmates with Brain Injuries

post thumbnail

Update on acquired brain injury among prison inmates describes limited treatment for prisoners with neurological issues and acquired brain injury. Many have unidentified brain injuries and head trauma despite histories of unconsciousness, concussions, hospital admissions and physical trauma or abuse.

Read More

Traumatic Brain Injury and Prisons: A Case Manager’s Experience

post thumbnail

As a volunteer and support group leader in jail and prisons, John Simpson describes unidentified head trauma and TBI, physical abuse, childhood brain injuries, multiple brain injuries and alcohol abuse among prison inmates. As a case manager, he discusses the impact of head trauma on social behavior, alcohol use and troubled relationships.

Read More

Grief after Brain Injury – There’s No Way Around It

post thumbnail

Grieving a loss after a death, catastrophic injury, chronic illness or transitional loss is a hard, long, and difficult process. When a family member survives a traumatic brain injury, there are still losses to grieve as life will not be the same again. Avoiding the emotional pain that comes with grieving can delay and complicate the healing process.

There is no way to the other side of grief except to go through it. Take time to heal – for however long that takes! You are worth it!

Each loss and every aspect of the loss can be a source of pain and must be grieved. Each loss needs to be worked through individually and yes, this takes time.

Read More

TBI in Marriage

post thumbnail

Married just nine months, her husband’s brain injury left Barbara Stahura feeling shocked, fearful and anxious about his survival and their future. Watching him in coma she questioned whether he would survive. Once medically stable, there were new concerns once he spoke as the severity of his brain injury became apparent.

She wanted to look inside Ken’s brain, to see what the scanning machines could not, to find his lost self. Would Ken’s brain heal? How much? When? No one could provide the answers. There was nothing to do but move through the days.

Read More

Special Dog Helps with Brain Injury and Disability

post thumbnail

What is a dog story doing in the Brain Injury Blog? Canine companions or dogs with special training to assist people with disabilities aren’t just for people who are blind.
Grace Peay tells the story of how her special dog, Ackerman, helped her regain her independence after her traumatic brain injury. Struggling with social isolation and depression in addition to her physical challenges after her brain injury, acquiring a canine companion required a lengthy application and training process.

The result is a loving companion, guide and assistant who helps her with the daily challenges of living with a brain injury. Ackerman is an amazing canine companion who has enriched her life.

Read More

Marriage after Brain Injury? It’s not easy

post thumbnail

“Who has those perfect relationships before a brain injury?” That’s the question of Beverly Bryant as she reflect on how her marriage with her husband and relationships with her children changed after her traumatic brain injury.

Moving on means grieving losses and letting go of one’s life prior to the brain injury. Recovery means allowing the survivor to take risks, make mistakes, and regain control while still giving help and support. Finding and maintaining relationships after brain injury is hard. But let’s be truthful. Building meaningful relationships is always hard.

Read More