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badge2Living your life with a brain injury is much more complex than physical survival and medical progress. These blog articles discuss the long term effects of brain injuries on relationships over time.

Grief after Brain Injury – There’s No Way Around It

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Grieving a loss after a death, catastrophic injury, chronic illness or transitional loss is a hard, long, and difficult process. When a family member survives a traumatic brain injury, there are still losses to grieve as life will not be the same again. Avoiding the emotional pain that comes with grieving can delay and complicate the healing process.

There is no way to the other side of grief except to go through it. Take time to heal – for however long that takes! You are worth it!

Each loss and every aspect of the loss can be a source of pain and must be grieved. Each loss needs to be worked through individually and yes, this takes time.

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TBI in Marriage

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Married just nine months, her husband’s brain injury left Barbara Stahura feeling shocked, fearful and anxious about his survival and their future. Watching him in coma she questioned whether he would survive. Once medically stable, there were new concerns once he spoke as the severity of his brain injury became apparent.

She wanted to look inside Ken’s brain, to see what the scanning machines could not, to find his lost self. Would Ken’s brain heal? How much? When? No one could provide the answers. There was nothing to do but move through the days.

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Special Dog Helps with Brain Injury and Disability

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What is a dog story doing in the Brain Injury Blog? Canine companions or dogs with special training to assist people with disabilities aren’t just for people who are blind.
Grace Peay tells the story of how her special dog, Ackerman, helped her regain her independence after her traumatic brain injury. Struggling with social isolation and depression in addition to her physical challenges after her brain injury, acquiring a canine companion required a lengthy application and training process.

The result is a loving companion, guide and assistant who helps her with the daily challenges of living with a brain injury. Ackerman is an amazing canine companion who has enriched her life.

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Marriage after Brain Injury? It’s not easy

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“Who has those perfect relationships before a brain injury?” That’s the question of Beverly Bryant as she reflect on how her marriage with her husband and relationships with her children changed after her traumatic brain injury.

Moving on means grieving losses and letting go of one’s life prior to the brain injury. Recovery means allowing the survivor to take risks, make mistakes, and regain control while still giving help and support. Finding and maintaining relationships after brain injury is hard. But let’s be truthful. Building meaningful relationships is always hard.

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“Imposter” Service Dogs

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As a TBI survivor, Kimberly Carnevale knows what it means to need assistance and accommodations for physical and cognitive impairments. As a trainer of service dogs, she trains business about the rights of people with disabilities and handicaps for accommodations. Recently, she’s gained a new and unexpected clientele – business owners who believe that their establishment had been visited by (and in many cases, damaged by) “imposter” service dogs. This is the canine version of illegally parking in a handicapped parking space.

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