Category Description:

badge2Living your life with a brain injury is much more complex than physical survival and medical progress. These blog articles discuss the long term effects of brain injuries on relationships over time.

Journal Writing: A Window into Life by Janelle Breese Biagioni

post thumbnail

It seems to be our nature to see the accomplishments of others; however, we often overlook our own. We either fear what we have done is not enough or we don’t see how all the little things we did actually contributed to a bigger accomplishment.

Journal writing is a great way to record short, simple notes so that from time to time you can read and reflect on your journey. Often, it’s surprising to see how far you have come.

Read More

A Conversation with Taryn Stejskal

post thumbnail

Traditional therapies after brain injury too often do not address changes in intimacy and sexuality when a spouse or partner has a TBI. This leaves couples struggling on their own at home and contributes to marital stress. Dr. Taryn Stejskal is one of the few clinicians who has specialized in counseling couples as they deal with the aftermath of brain trauma. In this interview with Barbara Stahura, Dr. Stejskal shares how she became interested in helping couples deal with changes in intimacy and sexuality and her perspective on the importance of rebuilding and sustaining personal relationships. Author of several tip cards on this topic, she is a popular author and speaker.

Read More

Understanding When Family and Friends Don’t Know How To Act

post thumbnail

We were sitting around on the deck the day after the wedding and at one point I was having trouble following the conversation. My brother stopped and said “OK everyone dial their intellect down a notch so Terri can follow” That was supposed to be funny. My reaction was wow – that hurt. I realized that it was his way of dealing with my occasional processing issues. It makes him uncomfortable and he does not know how to handle it.

Read More

Get a Group, Get a Life after Brain Injury

post thumbnail

But like any other human being since the dawn of time, hardship has reared its head repeatedly. From the unexpected loss of family members to a bankrupt business, some heavy blows have fallen. This does not make me unique. It simply makes me human. I carry no hard feelings or resentment about any of my challenges or difficult experiences. In fact, at a deeper level, I can appreciate them as they strengthen me. As steel is tempered and made stronger by fire, so have the fires of my own life, including my brain injury, made me stronger.

Read More

How much does traumatic brain injury really cost society?

post thumbnail

Despite what some people – and it seems most insurance adjusters may think – TBI doesn’t go away when the accident victim is released from the hospital or when the lawsuit ends. In fact — as the public becomes more and more aware of the real consequences to many professional athletes and football players in particular who have suffered head injuries during their playing careers — very real and devastating consequences can lie in store, even for less immediately debilitating head injuries and concussions.

Read More

Begin Again Ranch – Part 2

post thumbnail

Greetings friends. I can’t believe it is already the end of August. Next month will mark the three year anniversary of my accident. So much has changed. After 20 years we sold our home in California and moved our herd (our two horses that were boarded at a riding facility) to 6 acres in Colorado. So different ~ so much more work. The move has forced me to be more physically active – caring for a herd of 4 horses (2 of our own and 2 boarded) plus a new herd member – Burrito the mini donkey.

Read More

Begin Again Ranch

post thumbnail

Hello fellow brain injury survivors. My name is Terri Mongait and I, too, am a TBI survivor. Months after my accident in September, 2009 I was able to complete my studies and received my certification in Equine Gestalt Coaching. I am now a Brain Injury Recovery Coach at Begin Again Ranch in Sedalia, Colorado.

Read More

Never, never, ever give up hope

post thumbnail

It’s over six months since my last blog, and I’ve been a bit busy completing my PhD – which is now with the examiners. Phew! It’s been a battle with my constant brain injury shadows – the Brain Dragon that scorches holes in my memory, and doubles my vision and the Pain Monster isn’t much fun either! But it’s done and I’ve written three new chapters for the reprinting of my book ‘Doing Up Buttons’ and at last I can take a breath and spend a few minutes with you.

Read More

Self-Compassion for Caregivers — Try a Little Tenderness

post thumbnail

If you are a family caregiver for a person who has a brain injury this scene might look familiar. You are sitting in the physical therapy waiting room and can’t help sneaking glances at that couple across the room. The young husband, Sam, sits slumped in his wheelchair, speaks slowly with garbled phrases and jabs at his communication board to convey that he needs a drink of water. His shaved head is crossed with heavy sutures, and his left arm hangs limply. His wife, Sally, bends forward patiently, offering him words, her forehead furrowed with the effort to understand him and make him comfortable. Their three year old son entertains himself by tossing magazines in the air as he sings.

Read More

What Inspires You?

post thumbnail

When a brain injury has altered your life or your loved one’s life, often drastically and always without permission, it’s important to find inspiration in your life. It will keep you going on those dark days, providing some much needed light and comfort.

According to my friend Meira Yaer, in her book The Process of Empowerment: A Therapeutic Model After Brain Trauma, inspiration is “part of the mystery of the creative life force in humans. Once interest is indicated, inspiration leads the way.” The elements of inspiration, she says, are awe, creative impulse, the healing power of nature, and joy.

What inspires you?

Read More