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Support comes in many ways. It can be as simple as someone willing to talk with you and listen to your concerns. Or it can be more formal such as a support group, counselor, or conference. The most impotant aspect of support is that it is a reminder that you are not alone. These blog articles discuss the meaning and many forms of support for survivors, families and caregivers.

Brain Injury Adjustments: Self-Reinvention by Rodney Smith

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Brain Injury Adjustments: Self-Reinvention by Rodney Smith The “A-HA” Moment At some point adjustment occurs during the brain injury recovery journey, and there usually is an “a-ha” moment, if you will, where we realize that big and small changes have taken place.  It is time to make the best of things as they are.  Some […]

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Nurture the Living!! by Cathy Powers

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Nurture the Living!! by Cathy Powers, Author of SUSTAINING POWERS: Rising Above Grief and Loss Which is More Important? What if you had two fruit trees and one of them died? Would you continue to nurture them both?  You had personally devoted many years loving, caring for, and shaping these amazing fruit trees!  You looked […]

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Relocation Rebound – Dealing with Mild TBI and Stress Because of Moving, by C.C. LeBlanc

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C.C. LeBlanc, a mild TBI survivor, has gone through relocation stresses and suggests that before you move, carefully examine your needs for a meaningful quality of life. Almost everything you have developed in your life to be functional will be disrupted. You need to be prepared for stress, that your TBI will be aggravated, and your coping skills will be challenged. C.C. LeBlanc would like to share some guidelines based on her own experiences.

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You Look Good, You Sound Good by Amanda C. Nachman

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How many of us have heard these words over time since our brain injuries? I have realized that having a brain injury makes people uncomfortable. They don’t know what to say. Is it because they can’t see our injury? Is it because people who care about us just want everything to be okay? It could be all of the above. I don’t know.

I look good on the outside because it was my brain, an internal organ that was damaged.

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Real-Life Superheroes Do Exist (I’ve Seen Them)! by Kim Thompson

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You don’t have to be superman or superwoman to have special talents or powers. Kim Thompson’s brain injury blog explores what we expect from our superheroes and suggests that survivors of TBI are the most powerful heroes just by facing each new day.

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A Typical Day with a Brain Injury! (humor) by William C. Jarvis, Ed. D.

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Bill Jarvis shows how a “simple” trip to the store can turn into a confusing maze of detours and surprises when living with a brain injury. He has found that while brain injury isn’t funny, humor helps you cope – and that’s the title of his new book.

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Learn From Your Failures after Brain Injury by William C. Jarvis, Ed. D.

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Failure is not the end but the beginning of the journey for survivors of brain injury or TBI. Bill Jarvis explores how learning from failure brings you closer to success. It is the process of learning from mistakes that helps you go forward.

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Hobby Night for TBI Survivor Support by William C. Jarvis, Ed.D.

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William Jarvis shows how having a hobby night at a TBI Survivor Support Group can help build confidence, cognition and language expression. As a long-time survivor of a truamatic brain injury, Bill Jarvis has found innovative methods and practices to continue his cognitive rehabilitation and retraining over the years.

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Don’t be discouraged, there is always another bus for a TBI survivor! by William C. Jarvis, Ed.D.

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William Jarvis contrasts the wish of so many TBI survivors for immediate healing with the challenges of living with a brain injury over years and even a lifetime. Struggles for the TBI Survivor can seem endless. It is acquiring the internal strength of patience that can make living with this injury possible. Your mental attitude towards difficulties can make the difference. By learning from failures, becoming persistent, and having patience, life can be meaningful and rewarding.

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You Can Do More Than You Think as a TBI Survivor! by William Jarvis, Ed.D.

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William Jarvis is a TBI survivor who found that moving his home became an analogy for moving forward with his life and not allowing his TBI to limit his future. It’s been 14 years since his brain injury and he still deals with fatigue – both cognitive and physical fatigue. But he has found strategies that recharge him and help him accomplish what he needs to do during the day. While many survivors focus on the challenges and limitations, Jarvis suggests that engagement with life – not the past – is the key to moving forward. Moving his home became an analogy for moving forward with his life.

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