Category Description:

badge2Care and treatment of acquired and traumatic brain injury must address wide array of cognitive, emotional, behavioral, and physical symptoms.

Cognitive Rehabilitation After Brain Injury

post thumbnail

Cognitive Rehabilitation After Brain Injury by Kimberly S. Hutchinson, PhD and Lawrence S. Dilks, PhD You Know Someone Who has Experienced A Brain Injury If you are reading this, it’s likely that you or someone you know has experienced a brain injury. As recently reported, about 7,000 people a day are affected by some form of […]

Read More

Social Media: as an Advocate how do you use it?

post thumbnail

Twitter is unlike Facebook or LinkedIn because it doesn’t ask you to “friend” or “connect” with anyone.

Read More

Grieving Losses due to TBI by Denise Boggs

post thumbnail

Every TBI generates some degree of loss. Each injury, though unique and different, has one thing in common — loss. Whatever the loss may be, recognizing the stages of grieving will help us process the loss.

Read More

Acceptance of TBI by Pamela Taylor

post thumbnail

Yesterday, I heard the words that nobody wants to hear.

“Pam, you have known that you have a traumatic brain injury. We have tried therapies and medication. Your progress has been good. But, we are at a place where your recovery will not go much farther. You have to understand that the brains cells have died and they do not come back. You are closer to the old you than you were, but getting all the way back is not possible.”

Read More

Brain Injury Adjustments: Self-Reinvention by Rodney Smith

post thumbnail

Brain Injury Adjustments: Self-Reinvention by Rodney Smith The “A-HA” Moment At some point adjustment occurs during the brain injury recovery journey, and there usually is an “a-ha” moment, if you will, where we realize that big and small changes have taken place.  It is time to make the best of things as they are.  Some […]

Read More

The REAL Story about Mild Brain Injury and Concussion By Marilyn Lash, MSW

post thumbnail

The brain is a complex and vulnerable organ. As you can see, there is nothing mild about an injury to the brain. But by becoming more knowledgeable about mild brain injury, you can become an informed consumer of health services, effective health care provider, supportive family member, caring friend or colleague. It can happen to anyone.

Read More

COMA: When a Person Has Brain Injury by Ron Savage, Ed.D and Marilyn Lash-Cluett, M.S.W.

post thumbnail

Waiting and watching are the two words most often used by family members to describe what this time was like for them. The stress, worry and anxiety may feel overwhelming at times. It may be hard to concentrate or do even the simplest things. This period of coma is among the most difficult for family members because of its seriousness and uncertainty.

Read More

Use Your Words to Heal Within – Journaling is Free and Powerful by Janelle Breese Biagioni

post thumbnail

Don’t fret – journaling does not have to be an onerous task. Keeping a journal is much like keeping a little diary filled with tidbits of information that happens day to day. But you can take journaling to another level by infusing your entries with thoughts, feelings, and emotions. This is where the power of writing can help a person heal their broken heart or to record the history of their life, or to visualize their greatest dreams and desires.

Read More

Why Is Survivor Recovery Not Just Another Headline? by Bonnie Nish

post thumbnail

Concussion and survivor recovery stories told by Bonnie Nish and 19 authors, share personal experiences of support and hope. It has taken me a while to figure out in what context I wanted to frame why it was I wanted to pull this book together. Why in the middle of my own trauma would I start to think that Concussion and Mild Brain Injury: Just Another Headline was a good idea at all? Over the last few years I have had many gifts bestowed on me. Yes, some are the kind you can hold in your hand. Others however, are more cerebral and the kind you hold in your heart. Tonight I couldn’t find my keys and for an instant I could feel my stomach turn when I remembered last week having left them in the door for hours. It wasn’t that I was worried someone would walk away with them and use them later, it was that it was so reminiscent of that time in my life when I wouldn’t even have remembered putting them in the door in the first place.

Read More

Relocation Rebound – Dealing with Mild TBI and Stress Because of Moving, by C.C. LeBlanc

post thumbnail

C.C. LeBlanc, a mild TBI survivor, has gone through relocation stresses and suggests that before you move, carefully examine your needs for a meaningful quality of life. Almost everything you have developed in your life to be functional will be disrupted. You need to be prepared for stress, that your TBI will be aggravated, and your coping skills will be challenged. C.C. LeBlanc would like to share some guidelines based on her own experiences.

Read More