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badge2Care and treatment of acquired and traumatic brain injury must address wide array of cognitive, emotional, behavioral, and physical symptoms.

Make Every Day Holiday!!!!

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Put the holiday into perspective — It’s just a day that will be followed by another day and so on. By avoiding complaining, grumbling, or negativity about the celebration of any particular holiday, you will undoubtedly be in a better place. Though life is not as it was pre-brain injury and you most likely can’t celebrate as you once did, you can definitely honor and appreciate the very significant fact that you survived. You are alive!

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BRAIN INJURY JOURNEY BULLETIN: EXECUTIVE FUNCTIONS — Critical and Vital to Organization, Prioritizing, and Behaviors

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The brain, when it is functioning at optimum capacity, works in a unified way allowing us to take in information, process it, and act in a purposeful fashion. Purposeful behavior allows us to live safely in our environment, accomplish goals, and succeed to the best of our ability. Although the brain works in a unified way, the control mechanisms are complex systems. One system is executive functions. When they are compromised, there is a failure to organize and prioritize actions and behaviors.

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Cognitive Rehabilitation After Brain Injury

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Cognitive Rehabilitation After Brain Injury by Kimberly S. Hutchinson, PhD and Lawrence S. Dilks, PhD You Know Someone Who has Experienced A Brain Injury If you are reading this, it’s likely that you or someone you know has experienced a brain injury. As recently reported, about 7,000 people a day are affected by some form of […]

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Social Media: as an Advocate how do you use it?

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Twitter is unlike Facebook or LinkedIn because it doesn’t ask you to “friend” or “connect” with anyone.

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Grieving Losses due to TBI by Denise Boggs

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Every TBI generates some degree of loss. Each injury, though unique and different, has one thing in common — loss. Whatever the loss may be, recognizing the stages of grieving will help us process the loss.

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Acceptance of TBI by Pamela Taylor

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Yesterday, I heard the words that nobody wants to hear.

“Pam, you have known that you have a traumatic brain injury. We have tried therapies and medication. Your progress has been good. But, we are at a place where your recovery will not go much farther. You have to understand that the brains cells have died and they do not come back. You are closer to the old you than you were, but getting all the way back is not possible.”

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Brain Injury Adjustments: Self-Reinvention by Rodney Smith

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Brain Injury Adjustments: Self-Reinvention by Rodney Smith The “A-HA” Moment At some point adjustment occurs during the brain injury recovery journey, and there usually is an “a-ha” moment, if you will, where we realize that big and small changes have taken place.  It is time to make the best of things as they are.  Some […]

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The REAL Story about Mild Brain Injury and Concussion By Marilyn Lash, MSW

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The brain is a complex and vulnerable organ. As you can see, there is nothing mild about an injury to the brain. But by becoming more knowledgeable about mild brain injury, you can become an informed consumer of health services, effective health care provider, supportive family member, caring friend or colleague. It can happen to anyone.

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COMA: When a Person Has Brain Injury by Ron Savage, Ed.D and Marilyn Lash-Cluett, M.S.W.

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Waiting and watching are the two words most often used by family members to describe what this time was like for them. The stress, worry and anxiety may feel overwhelming at times. It may be hard to concentrate or do even the simplest things. This period of coma is among the most difficult for family members because of its seriousness and uncertainty.

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Use Your Words to Heal Within – Journaling is Free and Powerful by Janelle Breese Biagioni

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Don’t fret – journaling does not have to be an onerous task. Keeping a journal is much like keeping a little diary filled with tidbits of information that happens day to day. But you can take journaling to another level by infusing your entries with thoughts, feelings, and emotions. This is where the power of writing can help a person heal their broken heart or to record the history of their life, or to visualize their greatest dreams and desires.

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