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Advocacy takes man forms, but it is the power of change. There are many faces and forms of advocacy. Whether you are a survivor of a brain injury or stroke, a family member, a caregiver, a clinician or educator, you can make a difference for building awareness, increasing funding, and developing programs. Stand up and let your voice be heard!

Family Voices for Brain Injury and PTSD

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Family are direct witnesses to the needs of survivors of blast injury and traumatic brain injury. Their testimony can have an impact that is far greater and more powerful than any data or reports. Anna Freese, Director of Wounded Warrior Project’s (WWP) Family Support Program and liaison to family caregivers, knows this. She has given powerful professional and personal testimony to Congress on the critical support services that families need for our wounded warriors.

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November is National Family Caregiver Month

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Did you know that National Family Caregiver Month (NFC Month) is observed every November? The National Family Caregiver Association (NFCA) originated the observance in 1997 to focus attention on the more than 65 million family caregivers who provide 80% of the long-term care services in the US. Studies show that family caregivers provide over $375 billion in “free caregiving services” just in care for older adults annually.

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Understanding Brain Injury as a Chronic Disease

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Many brain injury survivors live many years after the injury. Some continue to make progress and do well, while others develop more health problems. There is a new way of thinking about brain injury that has implications for all survivors and their caregivers. The Brain Injury Association of America (BIAA) is striving to have brain injury reclassified as a chronic disease.

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Tips for Advocating for Yourself or a Loved One after Brain Injury

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An advocate is a person who pleads the case of another or argues for a cause. The same definition applies if you take on the role of self-advocate to plead your own case, which is as speaking up and speaking out for your rights. Regardless of whether you are speaking up for a family member or for yourself, the process can seem overwhelming. Here are a few tips to help you with your course of action:

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Survivor of Brain Injury – What’s in a Word?

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Survivor, person with a brain injury, brain injured person, brain injury survivor, disabled person, person with a disability, person who experiences brain injury – these are the words often used in reports, publications, and in the media. But there is an ongoing debate about what’s the best choice.

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