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There is nothing “mild” about a mild brain injury. The effects can range from headaches and fatigue to difficulty concentring and changes in vision. Fortunately, these effects are usually short term but for some, the consequences can be more serious and long lasting. These blogs on mild brain injury provide information and support.

Blast Injuries and Concussions in Veterans

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Blasts and explosions are major causes of brain injuries in soldiers injured in Iraq and Afghanistan. Concussion or mild brain injury is often not diagnosed since there is no loss of consciousness and soldiers return to duty. Post traumatic stress disorders (PTSD) have been diagnosed among soldiers and veterans exposed to combat stress who have returned home.

The severity of a brain injury ranges from very minor concussion to extremely severe brain trauma. Service members are exposed to additional damage from the blast’s impact. They can be thrown or propelled by the blast, be burned and inhale toxic substances.

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Normalcy after Brain Injury

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There was nothing mild about the effects of Diana Lund’s brain injury on her life. While she looked normal to others, her difficulty with memory, organization and problem solving meant she struggled to get through each day. Work became impossible. When the damage from a traumatic brain injury is not a visible disability, it is hard for friends, family and coworkers to recognize the cognitive losses.

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My Not-So-Mild “Mild” Brain Injury

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Anne Forrest’s account of her diagnosis, treatment and recovery from a so called mild brain injury shows how her life was completely changed by the trauma to her brain in a minor car accident. The cognitive changes resulted not only in the loss of her career, but made it difficult for her to simply get through the day. Looking “normal” made it hard for others to recognize her disability and needs for compensatory strategies and accommodations.

She says, “Looking back, I can see that I was exhausting myself trying to return to work and my normal life. My brain thought I was the old me, and I did not know I could not succeed at my old life with my now-injured brain.”

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Blast Injury PTSD in Reservists and National Guard by Marilyn Lash, M.S.W.

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Reservists and National Guard have long deployments in Iraq and Afghanistan which are stressful for families and children. War changes soldiers. Many veterans come home with blast injuries, undiagnosed concussions, post traumatic stress disorders (PTSD), burns and amputated limbs. Adjusting to civilian life, going to college, returning to work, and living with family can be stressful for veterans and family members.

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