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badge2Care and treatment of acquired and traumatic brain injury must address wide array of cognitive, emotional, behavioral, and physical symptoms.

Even Teachers Get Concussions by Amanda Nachman

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Amanda Nachman was an elementary schoolteacher for fifteen years prior to her mild traumatic brain injury in 2011. She is still working on her recovery, and writing to share her story to get the word out that not only athletes and soldiers are dealing with this invisible disability, but people we come across every day can be affected by the impact concussions can have on us. She is hoping she can help change the way the medical field responds to others who find themselves in a similar situation.

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TBI Student Survivor and School Success

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That last day of school in June felt liberating. I had the whole summer to recover and possibly a chance to go back to school full time in the fall. However, what I did not realize was that the stress was just beginning. Except for being tutored in two subjects a few days a week at school, I had not done any work at all from October-June. I had basically missed my entire sophomore year (I finished English, though) and I had to make it up somehow in one summer.

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Two Years…After Brain Injury by David Grand

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In a few days, I mark yet another milestone. It was on November 11, 2010 that I was struck while cycling. Two years ago, I was living the last few days of my pre-brain injury life, never knowing what the hand of fate was about to deal me. For many years, my dad has said that if he had the chance to look into a crystal ball to view the future, he would most likely pass. When I was a younger man, I simply could not understand his perspective.

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TBI Affects Student Executive Skills by Teresa Sacchi Armstrong, M.A.

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Students with brain injury or TBI often struggle with executive skills in the classroom. Because these high-level cognitive functions cue other mental functions, they are critical for children’s thinking and learning in school. But challenges in executive skills do not automatically qualify a student for special education. Careful assessment of strengths and deficits along with careful lesson planning, follow-up and support by teachers are critical for students with acquired brain injuries to function and succeed in the classroom as well as with homework at home.

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Understanding and Preventing Brain Injury in Children

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Michael Pines founded the Law Offices of Michael Pines, APC, in San Diego in 1992. Having worked with brain injury victims for over 20 years, Mike sees first-hand how incredibly devastating brain injury can be for individuals and families. He is an accident and injury prevention expert in San Diego, and on a campaign to end senseless injury one blog at a time.

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A Sampler of Journaling Techniques After Brain Injury

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After a brain injury to yourself or a loved one, you can begin journaling by simply writing your thoughts and feelings on paper or screen (or by speaking them into a recording device). But if you want or need more structure and ways to stay focused, some easy-to-learn techniques can make your journaling practice deeper, more satisfying, and healing. Among these techniques are the 5-Minute Sprint, Topics du Jour, and Lists of 100, all of which can help you to discover how to better manage your post-brain injury life.

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Returning to School after Brain Injury

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I was finally able to return to school part time in January, but with much apprehension. I had just started to put the days of the week and the months of the year in order and I was working on being able to walk better in a straight line and stand still without having to grab onto something.

I was still extremely symptomatic, and did not feel well at all, and consequently, I was unable to be my old self. One really cannot understand the frustration of this until they experience it first hand. I am usually a very energetic and upbeat person, but now my personality was completely flat and emotionless. I simply could not be “present” in any situation. I had damaged my brain and had been isolated from the world for three months. I was nothing but nerves and I was feeling self-conscious. Social situations of any kind were stressful. I could feel myself wanting to socialize and be with my friends, and take part in things, but physically, I was in such pain and completely exhausted, that I just could not do it. I could hardly follow a conversation and many people talking at once were a real bother to my head.

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In-School Strategies Can Help with Students with Memory after TBI

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Many students with traumatic brain injury or TBI have cognitive deficits, but memory can be especially challenging. Dr. Katherine Kimes explains the importance of matching the student’s learning style with cognitive strategies to help and support the student in the classroom. She provides a detailed list of educational strategies that teachers can use to help the child or adolescent who has challenges with memory and comprehension due to a brain injury.

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The Journal Ladder and A Few Cautions

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Journaling is usually a healthy, therapeutic strategy for people with brain injury and family caregivers. But for those who have suffered deep trauma, it’s important to create a journaling practice that is structured, with comfortable pacing, and ways to contain writing to prevent emotional meltdowns. If journaling about an especially difficult subject will make you “flip out,” don’t write just then. If you want to journal and also want good, basic guidance in how to get started, try using the Journal Ladder, developed by Kathleen Adams.

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Four Ways to Insure TBI Improvement!

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Improvement after a severe TBI after you go home is always difficult. This is because of the injury and usually the lack of ideas as to what to do. When in the hospital you have the expertise of therapists and medical personnel. When you go home, you often lack the clear thinking or experience to know what to do.

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