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badge2Care and treatment of acquired and traumatic brain injury must address wide array of cognitive, emotional, behavioral, and physical symptoms.

Four Ways to Insure TBI Improvement!

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Improvement after a severe TBI after you go home is always difficult. This is because of the injury and usually the lack of ideas as to what to do. When in the hospital you have the expertise of therapists and medical personnel. When you go home, you often lack the clear thinking or experience to know what to do.

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Helping Students in School with Attention after Traumatic Brain Injury or TBI

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Students with traumatic and other acquired brain injuries often have such difficulty with attention that it affects their ability to pay attention in class, study effectively, do homework and succeed in school. Katherine Kimes provides educational tips and strategies that teachers can use in the classroom to help improve a student’s attention and performance. These practical suggestions for students with brain injury (TBI) can be used by all educational staff as well as parents.

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Measurement for Brain Injury

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The measurement of physical improvement after an injury resulting from a Traumatic Brain Injury is initially the medical indications of brain activity through signs of physiological activity. This may be even during the time a person is in a coma.

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How much does traumatic brain injury really cost society?

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Despite what some people – and it seems most insurance adjusters may think – TBI doesn’t go away when the accident victim is released from the hospital or when the lawsuit ends. In fact — as the public becomes more and more aware of the real consequences to many professional athletes and football players in particular who have suffered head injuries during their playing careers — very real and devastating consequences can lie in store, even for less immediately debilitating head injuries and concussions.

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Living a New Normal – Part One

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My name is Madeline Uretsky, and I am a 16 year old high school student/athlete; I play soccer, ice hockey, and track, am an active member in my school/class, an honor roll student, and a very positive person. In a matter of seconds, all of this changed for me. You never think it’s going to happen to you.

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The Story of Your Brain Injury

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Learning to tell the story of our life after a brain injury, either as a survivor or a family caregiver, is a powerful method of exploring what we now believe to be true about ourselves and our lives. Our brains naturally perceive through story, and we live according to the stories we believe to be true. Most of this happens without our awareness, but by journaling we can consciously explore our beliefs and choose to release those that no longer serve us in positive ways. And when our pre-injury story no longer holds true, we can use journaling to create a new one that acknowledges our new reality and builds upon it.

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Managing Behavior in Children after Brain Injury or TBI

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Managing the behavior of students with traumatic brain injury can be challenging and frustrating for teachers, therapists and parents. Katherine Kimes explains four types of behavior management strategies that can be used in rehabilitation as well as at home and in school. By understanding how to identify changes in behaviors that are related to the brain injury or TBI and then measuring those behaviors, educators and therapists can develop and implement a plan to encourage positive adaptive behaviors and to decrease “problem” behaviors in children and adolescents.

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Getting Help for PTSD is a Step Forward for Veterans

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“Admitting that you have an issue with PTSD isn’t a sign of weakness. It is a sign that you are truly a strong person. Actively seeking a treatment plan or someone to talk with can be one of the most difficult things to do in your life, but it also can be one of the most rewarding.” These are the words of Matt Brown who knows first hand how hard it can be to ask for help.

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Behavioral Changes in Children and Adolescents with Brain Injury

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Changes in a child or adolescent’s behavior after a brain injury can be upsetting for parents and frustrating for teachers at school. A brain injury can cause behavioral, emotional and psychosocial problems, issues that were not once there for the student. Katherine Kimes describes what these changes in behavior may look like in the classroom. She discusses the complex interaction between damage to the youth’s brain, reactions by the student, and the child’s pre-existing abilities.

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How to Journal After Brain Injury (Even if You Can’t Write by Hand)

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Journaling after brain injury can help both survivors and family caregivers. If you haven’t journaled before, it helps to know that there are no rules to follow (except perhaps to date all your entries) and that you can adapt the process to suit yourself and your abilities. This includes the way you journal. You can write by hand in a journal or notebook. You can type into a computer file, or use voice-recognition software to speak your journal entries. And if none of these methods are available to you, you can ask a trusted person to scribe your words without changing them or making any judgments. There are some tips that can help you make the most of your journaling practice. All you have to do is give yourself permission to write.

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