Category Description:

badge2Care and treatment of acquired and traumatic brain injury must address wide array of cognitive, emotional, behavioral, and physical symptoms.

Executive Function Deficits in Children and Youth with Brain Injury

post thumbnail

A brain injury can affect executive functions in children – but what does this mean? Katherine Kimes explains that the frontal lobes of the brain are responsible for high level cognitive functions – commonly called executive skills. These skills include planning, information processing, memory, judgment, initiation, abstraction, emotional regulation, inattentiveness, and self-awareness. When these skills are affected in youth, students can have new challenges in school, at home and with peers. It’s important for educators and parents to recognize that an earlier brain injury can have a direct impact on that child’s ability to learn and function in the classroom.

Read More

Journaling After Brain Injury

post thumbnail

After a brain injury, survivors and family caregivers alike can use journaling to find some measure of peace, acceptance, clarity, and healing. The simple act of writing down their thoughts and feelings in a private journal can become a therapeutic tool that fosters self-empowerment. Journals are as unique as the people who keep them and can contain anything: events, dreams, lists, poems, quotes, art work, memories, celebrations, rants, and much more. In recording these things, people become their own compassionate listener—something that’s very important after the traumatic experience of a brain injury to oneself or a loved one. People in therapy can certainly keep a journal (many therapists now ask their clients to do this), but so can those who are not. In fact, keeping a journal is much like having a therapist—and it’s a lot cheaper!

Read more…

Read More

Seizures following Traumatic Brain Injury

post thumbnail

I have a client who is being tested at U of M hospital for post-traumatic Parkinson’s and seizures following a traumatic brain injury (TBI) from a truck accident after he struck his head. This case, as with Bryson’s, holds lessons for brain injury lawyers about the relationship between TBI and post-traumatic seizures. My client had what was initially classified as a very “mild” traumatic brain injury. Mild is a medical classification, and it does not mean the impairments are “mild” or that the consequences of brain injury for the accident victim are mild. And, over the past year, my own client’s condition clearly deteriorated.

Read More

Is PTSD a Disorder or Injury for Veterans?

post thumbnail

Many wives of wounded warriors have commented that too much of the attention on post-traumatic stress disorder or PTSD in our veterans and service members focuses on its negative aspects and not enough attention is given to effective treatment and progress. The American Psychiatric Associate is debating whether to officially change the wording from “disorder” to “injury” which might lessen the stigma associated with mental health treatment. For those wives who live with the fall-out from PTSD on a daily basis, Marshele Waddell offers an alternative name for PTSD that offers hope and progress.

Read More

Voices of Wives of Wounded Warriors

post thumbnail

Now caregivers as well as wives and mothers, many women are finding that the effects of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have changed not only their husbands but their entire family. As these women speak out about the changes in their marriages, parenting, and relationship, it becomes clear that the emotional trauma of war affects every member in the family as the wounded warrior comes home.

Read More

TBI and PTSD – Is there a difference?

post thumbnail

The symptoms and changes caused by traumatic brain injury (TBI) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are both similar and different. It can be stressful, frustrating, and difficult for family, spouses, and caregivers to know which condition is causing the changes in behavior, emotions or cognition. These invisible wounds are much harder to recognize than the physical changes, but they can be life altering. As wounded warriors return home, their families are struggling to understand their effects. Using an example of erratic driving and road rage, this blog post illustrates the compounded effects of PTSD and TBI.

Read More

Journaling Is Like a Hot Bath

post thumbnail

“You can change the world with a hot bath, if you sink into it from a place of knowing that you are worth profound care, even when you’re dirty and rattled.” ~ Anne Lamott

Isn’t this a beautiful quote? It warms my heart every time I read it. The phrase “profound care” invites me to sink into it, like that hot bath, and let the waters of deep, intense care embrace me. This sentiment applies to anyone, of course, but, to my mind, it applies especially to family caregivers.

Read More

TBI and PTSD affects wives as well as service members and veterans

post thumbnail

Weekend retreats help the women and wives of wounded warriors injured in Iraq and Afghanistan explore their own needs for support, help and encouragement as they deal with the emotional trauma as the effects of war come home with their husbands. Marilyn Lash is part of a team conducting retreats across the country and shares what she has learned from these women about the emotional aftermath of wartime injuries on marriage and parenting.

Read More

Stories We Tell Ourselves

post thumbnail

We humans are storytelling beings. We create our lives around the stories we hear, tell, and believe, and more importantly, around the meanings we give to those stories. After a brain injury to you or a loved one, the familiar stories of your life change, sometimes drastically, and the new stories you tell yourself can help or hinder your post-injury life.

Read More

“Once upon a time….”

post thumbnail

“Once upon a time….” Who hasn’t heard those words? The age-old beginning of fairy tales, they immediately focus you on the story to come. With excitement, you wonder what adventures await the hero or heroine.

Read More