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badge2Care and treatment of acquired and traumatic brain injury must address wide array of cognitive, emotional, behavioral, and physical symptoms.

Legal Position on Brain Injury – UK and USA

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In England and Wales the general attitude with regards to compensation for all personal injury claims, is that the compensation should aim to help the injured person return to the position they were in before the accident.

An injury claimant is entitled to an award for their suffering, pain, and loss of amenity which is assessed by guidelines, similar cases and their own personal circumstances. Expert evidence will be called from experts across a wide range of medical and non-medical fields to assist with this claim.

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Caregiver Distress

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Family caregivers of people with brain injury face stress, often intense, that can last for months and years. A new study suggests that the both emotional dysfunction and emotional health of a stressed caregiver can affect the recovery and rehabilitation of the injured person. Fortunately, there are many easy and inexpensive ways to relieve the stress associated with caregiving — including journaling, of course! — so that everyone can feel better. See more in this week’s post in Journal After Brain Injury, as well as prompts to help you deal with the stress.

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After Brain Injury: Telling Your Story, A Journaling Workbook

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Here is an excerpt of Garry Prowe’s fascinating review of Barbara Stahura’s book titled After Brain Injury; Telling Your Story, a Journaling Workbook. To read the entire review simply click here!

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What’s behind the misdiagnosis of brain injuries?

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Thousands of brain injuries are misdiagnosed every year, and people suffer because of it. Why does misdiagnosis happen on such a large scale? Aren’t healthcare providers supposed to be expert at diagnosing people?

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Begin Journaling about Surviving and Living with a Brain Injury

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You may have wanted to start a journal after your brain injury, but don’t know where or how to begin. Whether you are a family member, caregiver or survivor, journaling has many benefits. It can help reduce your stress, calm your anxieties, help you understand your emotions, and challenge your cognitive skills. But it’s easy to find excuses and put it off. After all, your life is pretty full right now – it may even feel too full at times and the thought of doing one more thing – like journaling – just seems like too much. Barbara Stahura, our expert on journaling after brain injury, can help you get started.

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Recognizing the Signs and Symptoms of Concussion in Children and Youth

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A concussion can have many effects on a child or youth’s performance in the classroom, ability to play sports, participation in activities with friends, and behavior at home. Everyone who is involved with a student athlete is responsible for being aware of the signs and symptoms of concussion, monitoring the child’s recovery, and providing supports and accommodations. This includes the physician, parents, friends, teachers, school nurses, coaches and athletic trainers.

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One Good Word

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Do you have some favorite quotes? Quotes that lift you up, inspire you, make you smile or laugh, or that you can just plain feel down to your soul? Copying favorite quotes into your journal is an excellent practice for a couple of reasons. One, you have a great resource for those times when you need a lift, and two, you can use the quotes as prompts for your own writing. You can savor them, discover what they really mean for you, and in the process, discover more about yourself.

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Improving after Brain Injury

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A plan for improvement is a must. All improvement programs that are effective start with a plan. If there is no plan, there is no direction on how to proceed. A person with a TBI often lacks the thought process to think through this first step. Therefore, no plan results in minimal progress. While at the hospital, a therapist has a plan and knowledge as what to do for you in these early stages of your recovery.

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Supporting Wives of Wounded Warriors with Brain Injury and PTSD

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Retreats for wives of wounded warriors help women find support and address needs for emotional healing. As caregivers of veterans with disabling injuries and PTSD, they are experiencing compassion fatigue and secondary stress. Marilyn Lash is part of a team with Hope for the Homefront conducting weekend retreats across the country with the support of Operation Homefront.

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Being a Teacher About Brain Injury

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Today’s post at http://journalafterbraininjury.wordpress.com is about being a teacher about brain injury. A couple of weeks ago, you learned how you could find life-teachers all around you. But did you know you could easily be a good teacher for others, too? Have a look and see what insights come from your writing to one or two of the prompts.

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