Category Description:

badge2Care and treatment of acquired and traumatic brain injury must address wide array of cognitive, emotional, behavioral, and physical symptoms.

Owning Your Story is Key to Moving Forward

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Clinging to memories of your pre-injury self and who you “used to be” keeps you focused on what has been lost. Focus determines where energy flows, so thinking this way keeps you stuck in the past, unable to move forward into whatever new life is possible. Instead, if you can own your story, even the parts you would prefer not to, you can make progress away from that stuck point. When you own your story, it doesn’t matter so much that you aren’t who you used to be. It matters much more who you are now and who you can become in the future.

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Character Sketch

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I am an avid fan of journal writing. I have written about it many times because the benefits of journaling are phenomenal. The most obvious is that is a way to record time, keep track of our accomplishments, disappointments and transformations. The added benefits are very therapeutic. For example, keeping a journal to record your feelings and thoughts provides the writer with a safe, non-judgemental place to work through what is going on for them.

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Learning From Your “Teachers”

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Life offers us many teachers, some quite unexpected, and if we pay attention, we can learn a great deal from them. After a brain injury, to yourself or a loved one, discovering our “teachers” and learning from them can help us settle into our new normal and continue to progress and grow. Journaling for a few minutes about these teachers can enlighten us and point us in new directions we hadn’t considered before.

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Driving, PTSD and Traumatic Brain Injury – New Dangers

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The combined effects of traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder or PTSD are creating new risks for service members as they come home and resume driving. Up to now, we’ve been focused on the risks of driving for adolescents and the elderly, but new concerns are arising for our veterans. Everyday traffic noises and sights can trigger flashbacks. Speeding, road rage and impulse control pose real dangers for the driver, passengers and pedestrians.

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New Beginnings after Brain Injury

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It’s still January, still the beginning of a new year. The time of year we all get a do-over. People make promises to start over: lose weight, exercise more, get that promotion, or spend more time with family. They make these promises because they choose to. They make them because they want to.

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How Families Cope after Brain Injury by Marilyn Lash, M.S.W.

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Every family has an emotional reaction when a spouse, sibling, child, or other relative has a traumatic brain injury. Each family has learned ways of coping from previous experiences with stresses, losses and changes in their lives. Some methods of coping have been productive for families in the past and helped ease not only their levels of stress and anxiety, but helped them problem solve and prepare for the future. Other ways of coping may not have been as productive for families. Some may have learned from this and changed how they cope with stress or change, while others may be stuck repeating negative patterns.

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Psychological Dimension TBI Improvement – Part 4

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The psychological aspect of improvement is probably the greatest influence upon the other three areas. It is assumed there is also a culminating effect of applying cognitive strategies for improvement in other dimensions as well. It is a person’s ability to psychologically know he is improving when progress is so slow that makes the difference.

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Build Resiliency with Positive Emotions after Brain Injury

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Did you know that you can increase your ability to rebound from setbacks and adversity? Like anything else, it takes practice, but it is possible to build your resilience and create a more satisfying life. While resilience is important at any time, it can play an even bigger role after a brain injury to you or a loved one, when your life is disrupted and you face challenges you never imagined.

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Family Voices for Brain Injury and PTSD

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Family are direct witnesses to the needs of survivors of blast injury and traumatic brain injury. Their testimony can have an impact that is far greater and more powerful than any data or reports. Anna Freese, Director of Wounded Warrior Project’s (WWP) Family Support Program and liaison to family caregivers, knows this. She has given powerful professional and personal testimony to Congress on the critical support services that families need for our wounded warriors.

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Journaling – Your Story Matters

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Why? Because the best way to understand brain injury is to know what it does to people—survivors and family caregivers alike—and how it changes their lives. For instance, an injury to the frontal lobes can harm cognitive functions such as planning, working memory, attention, inhibition, problem solving, initiation, and monitoring one’s actions. Knowing that from a medical standpoint is necessary. Yet that might not make much impact until you know that such an injury can prevent a person from working, which means the loss of a home to the survivor and her young children. Where do they go now? How will they survive? This woman’s story matters not only to her and her family, but also to society.

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