Category Description:

badge2Care and treatment of acquired and traumatic brain injury must address wide array of cognitive, emotional, behavioral, and physical symptoms.

Physical Dimension TBI Improvement

post thumbnail

Never seeing improvement day to day is discouraging, but eventually seeing and knowing improvement is motivating. Success is seen and experienced in the long term if you record improvement daily no matter how small. This will encourage a person psychologically.

Read More

Journaling Helps after Traumatic Brain Injury

post thumbnail

A brain injury can affect so many aspects of a survivor’s and family’s life that it can feel overwhelming at times. So many caregivers and family members feel alone and confused as they struggle to know the “new person” who is their loved one. These feelings of isolation and loss are also common among survivors of brain injury – whether you are a civilian or a veteran.

Read More

PTSD and Your Children on the News

post thumbnail

As troops are returning home from deployments in Iraq, a regular feature on the evening news has become reunions with spouses, parents, and children. Because I live inNorth Carolinawhere there are multiple bases, I see this at least once a week – finally, some joy on the evening news in between the latest disaster, political campaign, or financial report. Especially touching are the reunions when a parent – still in camouflage uniforms – appears at school to surprise a child who has not seen mom or dad for many, many months or more than a year. It is impossible not to smile, and I admit to tearing up occasionally, at the incredible joy of this “parent and child reunion” to borrow a phrase from a Paul Simon song.

Read More

Writing is a Courageous Act

post thumbnail

Picking up a pen and writing about ourselves in our journal takes courage—especially if we intend to tell the truth of our experience. It can be more than difficult to write about our not-so-proud moments. But when we do write, we learn about ourselves, process what we have experienced, and use what we learn as steppingstones to the future.

Read More

Who’s Really Running the Show?

post thumbnail

We all react to others, and often that means we give up control over our lives to some degree. Sometimes we do this consciously, but most times, we don’t realize how we’re changing our behavior to suit someone else. And it’s not necessarily good for us. So read the story in this week’s post at Journal After Brain Injury (I hope you get a chuckle out of it), and then pull out your journal and choose a prompt or two to write about.

Read More

The Importance of a Rehabilitation Focus in Recovery after Brain Injury

post thumbnail

Rehabilitation after brain injury is hard. It is not fun. It isn’t glamorous. But it is THE most important component to a person’s recovery.

A rehab program is customized to meet the needs of the person and involves professionals such as a physiotherapist, occupational therapist, speech-language pathologist, and a neuropsychologist. Rehab can be done at home, in an outpatient setting at the hospital, a rehab facility or in a medical clinic. The goal of rehabilitation is to assist the person in restoring functions they lost as a result of the brain injury but that can be restored, or to learn how to do things differently if those functions cannot be restored. While rehabilitation sounds like an event, in my opinion, it is more like a process… a process that is built upon each time the person does the work. A process takes time… sometimes a long time.

Read More

Peer Support after Brain Injury

post thumbnail

Peer Support is essentially individuals supporting other individuals with similar or shared experiences. This support is offered one-to-one or in a group setting. The benefits of peer support are numerous, including that the supporter has credibility and is trusted because they have been through the experience.

Read More

November is National Family Caregiver Month

post thumbnail

Did you know that National Family Caregiver Month (NFC Month) is observed every November? The National Family Caregiver Association (NFCA) originated the observance in 1997 to focus attention on the more than 65 million family caregivers who provide 80% of the long-term care services in the US. Studies show that family caregivers provide over $375 billion in “free caregiving services” just in care for older adults annually.

Read More

What’s Your Story after Brain Injury

post thumbnail

After the trauma of a brain injury and all the changes it brings to your life and the life of your family, it’s important to discover the story of your new life. We humans respond deeply to story. We can’t help it. We’re not only natural-born story tellers, we are stories. Before your brain injury, or the injury of a loved one, you had one story of your life. Now you have a new one, which can be confusing, frightening, even incomprehensible. Uncovering the story of your post-injury life will help you understand what has happened, how you are reacting, and the actions you can take to enhance your life today and in the future. One good way to do this is to write in a journal.

Read More

The 80% Rule After Brain Injury

post thumbnail

Fatigue is a common issue following brain injury. Generally, we encourage people to get lots of sleep and to take rest breaks during the day. When a person doesn’t listen to cues their mind or body gives them (i.e. feel as though you have hit the wall; can’t take in anymore information etc.) the physical and emotional fatigue can result in unintended consequences (i.e. outbursts, tears, anger, agitation).

Read More