Category Description:

badge2Care and treatment of acquired and traumatic brain injury must address wide array of cognitive, emotional, behavioral, and physical symptoms.

Journaling After Brain Injury

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After my husband, Ken, sustained a TBI in 2003 as the result of a hit-and-run, I journaled every day, sometimes pages at a time. It was often the only thing that helped me feel grounded. In 2007, I created a journaling workshop for people with brain injury, and since then I’ve facilitated the six-week group twice a year here in Tucson.

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Is Brain Injury a Disease or a Disability?

We usually think of traumatic brain injury as disability, a condition, an event or an outcome. Dr. Brent Masel’s position that it is a disease has been adopted by the Brain Injury Association of America.

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Sports Concussions

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There has been so much in the news lately about sports concussions that we really feel a responsibility to our readers to provide as much information as possible. Simply put, a concussion is a mild traumatic brain injury that temporarily disrupts the normal functioning of the brain. A direct blow to the head, face, neck, or an indirect blow elsewhere that causes an impulsive force to the head can produce a concussion.

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Cognitive Rehabilitation Therapy – How Are We Really Treating Our Service Members and Veterans with Brain Injuries?

Cognitive rehabilitation for persons with traumatic brain injury has been examined and questioned in terms of its outcomes and cost effectiveness. The civilian sector has worked long and hard with insurance companies, Medicaid and Medicare to recognize the benefits of cognitive rehabilitation therapy. Now Tricare, the insurance program that covers service members and veterans, is refusing to cover cognitive rehabilitation at the time when brain injury is recognized as the signature wound of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

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Let’s Not Forget about Concussion in Children and Young Athletes

Concussions in professional sports and college athletes are gaining increasing attention with increased reporting in the National Football League and closer monitoring of symptoms. But the effects of concussions on children and youth over time are still largely unknown. Because the child’s brain is still developing, the long-term consequences of concussions in youth are still unclear and in need of research and study.

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Service Dogs Help Veterans with PTSD

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There’s some really interesting research being funded by the Department of Defense on the use of psychiatric service dogs to help veterans deal with the psychological wounds of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Many veterans who have received service dogs are reporting dramatic decreases in the symptoms of post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as well as the use of medications.

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Risky business!

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The United States military branches are now concerned over the level of suicides and accidental deaths occurring among returning combat veterans. Many of the returning vets are seemingly prone to risky behavior. One example is a of a Senior Airman caught speeding at 120 mph in Florida, on his new motorcycle, 2 months after returning to the states.

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Journaling after Brain Injury – Why writing helps

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“Writing about something that bothers us helps us come to terms even with events we don’t fully understand, and then we can go on with other things.” This comment by James Pennebaker, a well known author and expert on journaling, provides the premise for Barbara Stahura’s interest in journaling after brain injury.

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Concussion and Football – What’s the big deal?

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Last Sunday evening, my husband and I were watching the Philadelphia Eagles and Indianapolis Colts football game on television – he with lots of quarterbacking from the couch and me with simmering patience as I waited for 60 Minutes to come on. But the game got my attention when the loud crack of a violent tackle resulted in a player lying unmoving on the field for close to 10 minutes.

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Concussions in High School Sports

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This is the title of an excellent article by Dr. George Wham, Jr. in the Fall 2010 issue of Headlights!, the newsletter of the Brain Injury Association of South Carolina. His research team at the University of South Carolina surveyed all high schools in SC to examine the medical care provided in their athletic programs. They found that SC schools with access to athletic training services provided a significantly higher level of medical care than schools without them.

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